Dew and Moss Sewing Party

Today I’m joining in on the Dew and Moss sewing party over on Instagram. I know not everyone is on Instagram, so I thought I’d share some of the fun here.

Dew and Moss is the debut line of the very talented Alexandra Bordallo for Art Galery Fabrics. It features adorable illustrations of houses, flowers, bugs, lanterns, garden people and more all in fabulous earthy colors. I chose to make a quilt (as us quilters are wont to do), and I absolutely love how it turned out!

Now, normally, when I feature a quilt here I have it completely quilted and bound. And that was absolutely my intention with this quilt. But, time got away from me. And I’m planning on hand quilting this quilt. So it just wasn’t possible to show you the complete quilt at this time. But, I do have the quilt top all done to show you.

When Alexandra originally announced she was looking for people to join in, I already had the quilt designed and cut out! I even sent her this photo showing the progress. And can you see? Yes, the quilt that I designed and the quilt that I made are slightly different. And it is interesting to see what a few fabric substitutions can do when creating a quilt!

Even so, I was able to complete the quilt top last night, and take photos of it on the back fence this morning. No moss here in San Diego, but plenty of dew to show off the fabrics.

Even if you don’t have Instagram you can click here to check out the whole Dew and Moss Sewing Party on Instagram.

Everlasting Blog Tour

I’m so excited to join in today on the Everlasting Blog Tour! When Sharon Holland asked if I’d like to join in to make a project with her gorgeous new fabric line for Art Gallery Fabrics, of course I said YES! And here is the quilt that I made to showcase these fantastic prints:

The quilt was largely an improv project. I knew I wanted to use the fabrics to do some English Paper Piecing. I got my hands on the new Brimfield Awakening Brimfield Beginnings blocks. I chose the Soleil Brimfield Beginnings design. I actually made four of these blocks, but in the end decided that I would just use three for the quilt.

Once I had the Soleil blocks pieced, I needed to figure out a background. I knew I wanted something simple and modern. So I went with two 10″ strips from the Everlasting line, and then large pieces of Art Gallery Fabrics solids. A few quick seams was all I needed to stitch the background together. I then glue basted the Soleil blocks in place.

I used more Art Gallery Fabrics solids for the backing, then made the quilt sandwich. I made sure to line up the seam on the backing fabric with the middle seam on the quilt top. I love these small details of having everything line up!

The quilting is deceptively simple. I say that it is deceptive because you would think that straight lines done with a walking foot would be simple. But I found a way to complicate it.

For the two prints on the bottom, I stitched rows an inch apart using Wonderfil’s 12wt thread. It gives great texture, but keeping the lines an inch apart means that the fabric really gets to shine. For the solids, I chose to quilt lines 1/2″ apart, but with regular piecing-weight thread instead of 12wt.

I didn’t want to quilt over the Soleil blocks. And I wanted this quilt to be quilt show quality. So, I stopped each line of stitching as I came to a Soleil block, and then picked it up again on the other side. At each start and stop I tied off the thread and buried the ends. That meant over 100 tie-offs on this quilt! A lot of extra work, but I absolutely love the effect.

To add a little extra fun and whimsy to the front, I quilted pebbles inside the centers of the Soleil blocks. I think this was a fun design choice, and it had the added benefit of not needing all the tie-offs that would have been required if I stitched the lines through the center!

The final decision in the process was how to bind the quilt. Did I want to use more prints from the collection? Did I want to match the binding to the fabric on the front of the quilt? In the end I went for Art Gallery Pure Solids that were close in color to the fabrics used on the front. I chose two different solids that I color-blocked to go with the piecing on the front. The teal is along the bottom row, and then the grey goes around the rest of the quilt. This is the first time I’ve matched up the seams in my binding with the seams in the quilt, and I loved the result! I’ll absolutely do this again in the future!

I then hand-stitched down the binding on the back. This quilt won’t be entered into the San Diego Quilt Show (the deadline for entering was last week), but I wanted it to be show-quality, with all the details I’d keep in mind if it was going to be entered. Maybe I’ll enter it in an upcoming show!

The result is a quilt that could be double-sided. The back has almost as much interest as the front. And I love that the binding really pops against the backing fabrics.

All that is missing is a name for the quilt. I think I might stick with the simple title of “Everlasting Quilt.”

The Everlasting Blog Tour is just getting started! Check out more inspirational projects made with this line in the coming weeks. You can follow along the whole tour using the links below:

July 12Sharon Hollandhttps://www.sharonhollanddesigns.com
July 15Marija Vujcichttp://maraquiltdesigns.com/
July 16Carolina Moorehttp://www.AlwaysExpectMoore.com
July 17Dana Willardhttps://www.madeeveryday.com
July 18Lisa Rublehttp://lovetocolormyworld.blogspot.com/
July 19Dritz Sewinghttp://makesomething.dritz.com
July 22Eleri Kerianhttps://sewandtellproject.com/everlasting-fabrics-blog-tour/
July 23Marisa Wilhelmihttp://sewtellme.blogspot.com
July 24Sharon McConnellhttps://colorgirlquilts.com
July 25Morgan M.https://www.modernlymorgan.com
July 26Alexis Wrighthttps://mysweetsunshinestudio.com
July 29Priscilla Geisslerhttps://cottonstitch.ca
July 30Maureen Cracknellhttps://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com

Quilted Pocket Organizer

When Mr. Domestic asked if I’d be part of his blog hop showing off his new line of Aura fabrics with Art Gallery Fabrics, of course I said yes and started thinking of how I wanted to use these pretty fabrics. What I immediately decided was something simple and practical. Because while I love quilts, I have so many that sit in a chest waiting for their day in the sun. And I knew I didn’t want to do that with these beautiful fabrics. So, I created a Quilted Pocket Organizer. This is a simple wall-hanging that it perfect for showing off favorite fabrics, and is super practical as a way to sort mail, keep track of important papers, or tuck items that you will need on your way out the door (like earbuds or a phone charger).

Doesn’t it show off the fabrics beautifully!? I love those gorgeous tropical florals!

Here are the basics for making this organizational wall hanging:

And here are the tips you’ll need to know in putting it together:

Once you cut all your pieces, place a purple and a cream right-sides-together, and stitch along ONE side. If your fabrics are directional, this will be the top edge. Then add interfacing on the back of the purple fabric. This will give your pocket extra body. If you want, you can add quilting or stitching at this stage for a little decoration.

Then layer the pocket together with a cream square when you add the bottom horizontal sashing piece to each. Move the pocket out of the way as you add the top horizontal sashing piece. Once all the pockets and horizontal sashings are stitched in place, add the side borders.

Then you can quilt as desired! I did a little stitch-in-the-ditch as well as supportive quilting on the outside of each pocket to give it extra stability. You can add whatever quilting you desire – just don’t quilt those pockets closed!

Before binding, I cut two 5″ squares that I folded on the diagonal, and put them in the top corners as hanging pockets. All I had to do was add a dowel, and the pocket organizer was ready to hang!

I love how it turned out, and these pockets are so handy by my front door!

Be sure to check out all the other awesome quilters and sewists who have joined in on Mister Domestic’s Aura Blog Party!


The Largest Quilt I’ve Ever Made

Several years ago, I created a block of the Month Quilt for FaveQuilts. I put together a series of 12 blocks, and flew to their offices in Chicago to film the videos to go along with the series. To do this, I made the quilt for the series, and made what are called “step outs” of each quilt block. These are partially-completed versions of the block so that I’m not spending the whole time in the studio stitching seams that will not be in the finished video. But, it meant that I had a whole lot of partially-completed quilt blocks when I went home.

Finished 108" Quilt

It was always my intention to stitch these blocks together to make a quilt for my bed. In our room, my husband and I have a California King sized bed. I had yet to make a quilt for this bed, and thought that having so many partially completed blocks that went well together would be a great start.

The blocks sat in a box in my closet. A great start still needs momentum to become a great finish.

Finally, over the summer of 2018, I pulled out the blocks to make them into a quilt for our anniversary (August 26th). I bought the background and backing fabric I’d need, finished up the partially completed blocks, used the leftovers and scraps to make even more blocks, and planned the layout.

Once the top was finished, I needed to quilt it. I really wanted to quilt it myself. While I could rent time on a local longarm to quilt it, I love quilting on my domestic sewing machine. So that is what I did. After 2 days of quilting, I had barely made a dent. On our anniversary, I showed my husband the partially-completed quilt with the quilt label already stitched into the backing.

After that, I had to put the quilt aside. I had other projects with deadlines that needed to get done.

But I really wanted to finish the bed quilt. So, the week between Christmas and the New Year, I pulled the quilt out again. I got it quilted, squared up, and bound, finishing the last binding stitches in the last hour of 2018. I was able to put the quilt on our bed, and wake up under it in the new year.

It was still a few weeks before I was able to take it out to the park to get photos of the full quilt to share. Forgive the cat hair on the quilt, she’s loving it as much as we are.

And when you look at how densely I quilted it, you’ll understand why it took me so long to finish.

I’m very excited to have the quilt finished, and would say that I’m considering smaller projects from here on out… except that I already have BIG plans for 2019!!

Announcing the Quilty 5k!

I am super excited to announce a new quilting series that I’m starting here, and on my YouTube Channel!

It is called the Quilty 5k! There are 7 blocks in a mile, and 3.1 miles in a 5k. So for the quilty 5k, we’ll be completing 22 blocks. Each will have instructions for stitching it in 3 different sizes, as well as different coloring options and a coloring sheet so you can design your own quilts using the quilt blocks!

Check out all the details in the intro video!

I hope you’ll join in!


Free Motion Quilting II

One of my most popular videos on YouTube is a simple video where I teach 8 simple free-motion quilting designs. Recently, I hit 10,000 subscribers on my YouTube channel, and decided to celebrate by following up on that popular video.

This video is a sequel of sorts to the first video. I show you 8+ more free motion quilting designs that you can make that expand on that same swirl motion that I taught in the first video.

I hope you enjoy learning a little more about free motion quilting!

Quilting made easy with Riley Blake and Cricut – Part 3 of 3

Welcome to the 3rd part of this video and quilting series! Over the past weeks I have been working on making a Christmas Quilt using Riley Blake Fabrics and the Cricut Maker. In Part One I showed you how I selected the fabric and pattern. In Part Two I showed you how all the pieces were cut. And today… today we are piecing the Half Log Cabin Throw quilt top!

Quilting Made Easy with Riley Blake and Cricut PArt 3 - Learn how to piece the quarter log cabin quilt pattern!

 

To finish up this series I’ve created another video. This video is long, but oh-so-comprehensive! I’ll be holding your hand and taking you step-by-step through how to make this quilt. It is always more fun to make a project with a friend, and I hope you’ll stitch along side me as we make this quilt together!

We’ll make the units, put together the blocks, build the rows, and stitch up this quilt top. When we get to adding the borders, I’ll give you some tips on how to get a nice smooth border with no ruffles!


If you’d rather read along, I’ll lay out the basics of making the quilt here. Remember that a full set of PDF instructions is in Design Space that will also help you in making the quilt.

We’re going to start by laying out all of our fabrics. The inner border, outer border, and binding fabric can be put aside. Label the other fabrics by fabric number to make it easier to grab the right fabric as you lay out the block units.

label your fabrics when quilting

Using the PDF instructions, grab a square of fabric one and the smallest rectangle in fabric 8. Place them right sides together and stitch.

(BTW – all seams in this quilt are 1/4″.)

stitch first two pieces

Then press your seam towards the dark.

press first stitch

Add the next size up of fabric 8. Stitch and press. Repeat with the same size of fabric 1, and then the largest strip of fabric 1. You’ll have your first block unit complete!

finished first block

Repeat the process for all the block units – you’ll be making 6 of each. Check the PDF for all the fabric combinations. If you watch the video, I’ll show you how you can save time making these units by strip piecing.

next block

Once you have all your block units, lay out block A. Stitch the top and bottom units together. Press the seam to the right. Repeat with the bottom two units, pressing the seam in the opposite direction. Then stitch the top and bottom together. You can press the middle seam up, down, or spin the seam (watch the video and I’ll show you this technique)! Make 6 of this block (Block A).

putting it together

Now you’ll follow the same steps as Block A, but to make Block B. Which is the same, but with different fabrics.

Block B

Once your blocks are done, stitch them into rows! You’ll have 4 rows, each with 3 blocks. 2 of the rows have a block A flanked by block B on either side. The other 2 rows are block B flanked by Block A on either side. Press the seams of the first row in one direction, and the seams on the other row in the other direction.stitch the rowsThen stitch your rows together (alternating the A row with the B row), and press all the seams in one direction. Your blocks are all together! Now it is time to add the borders! I want to share my special border-adding tip with you.

First we’ll be adding the side borders. Measure both sides of your quilt, then measure the center of your quilt from top to bottom. This tells you the height of your quilt on both sides and in the middle. Add these 3 numbers together then divide by 3. That is the size you should cut your side borders. This will keep you from having wavy borders.

Pin the border in place. First by pinning each end. Then pinning the middle. Then pinning along each half so that the border is smoothly in place. Once it is pinned, you can stitch.

pin on border

Repeat the process of measuring the top, bottom, and middle to cut the top and bottom borders to size. Pin them the same way, then stitch. Repeat all these steps to cut, pin, and stitch on your outer borders. Once your borders are on, your quilt is done!

stitch on borders

This quilt has been so much fun to put together – I hope you enjoyed it, too! I’m considering putting together a bonus video to show you how to quilt this lap sized quilt on a domestic sewing machine. But if you prefer, you can absolutely have a long-arm quilter do the quilting, and then you just have to bind it. You can search this site for lots of tips on quilting your quilt, and binding it!

Thanks to Cricut and Riley Blake for asking me to put together this series! I can’t wait to show you more quilting and crafting fun!

 

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Quilting made easy with Riley Blake and Cricut – Part 2

I’m excited to share part 2 of my “Quilting Made Easy” series with Riley Blake and Cricut. When Cricut offered to send me a Riley Blake quilt kit of my choice to share with y’all, and show you how easy it is to whip up a quilt when Cricut takes care of the bulk of the cutting, I was excited! I love sharing innovative ways to approach quilting, and these quilt kits are a fantastic way for both beginners and experienced quilters to put together quilts that look beautiful every time!

Last week I showed you how easy it was to pick out a fun fabric kit, and to pick a pattern to go with it. Today I’m opening up the pattern and doing all the cutting.

quilting made easy with Riley Blake and Cricut - part 2 of 3

If you’d rather hang out with me while I go over all the details, I put together a video where I take you step-by-step through the cutting process. You can pause, rewind, and watch at your own pace. I’ve put the video here:

 

If you’d like to read through the steps, I have you covered as well.

First, let’s talk tools. Cricut has some great kits that are perfect for doing all the pre-cutting needed. They have a rotary blade, ruler, and mat set that is exactly right for cutting those large 12″ wide strips needed for the Cricut mat. Be sure to check out the Cricut cutting tools – they are the experts when it comes to sharp blades that cut well!

Cricut tools for quilting

Start by removing the fabric from the zippered bag it came in (by the way, this zippered bag becomes an awesome shoe bag for traveling!), and pull out the paper it came with as well.

planning the quilt

I also printed a screen shot of the cutting instructions, since those are not available as a PDF. I put all the fabrics in order – fabric 1 through 11. I removed fabric 11, which was the 3/4 yard piece of fabric. Beware, it is the exact same as fabric 4, which is a 2/3 piece. Make sure you’re setting aside the 3/4 yard piece which will be used for the binding later.

From fabric 1, cut two 12″ wide strips.

rotary cutting fabric

Cut fabric 4 into two 1/3 yard pieces (1/3 yard is 12″, so you’ll be cutting it in half to make two 12″ strips).

Then from your inner border fabric (fabric 3) cut 5 strips, each 2″ wide.

cut inner border

From the outer border fabric, cut 5 strips, each 5.5″ wide.

cut outer border

 

I know what you’re thinking – this is supposed to be all about how great the Cricut machine is for cutting fabric, and we haven’t even pulled out the Cricut machine yet! Yes, that is true. The Cricut Maker is great for cutting fabric. But for some projects, a little pre-cutting is needed. There are 11 fabrics in this kit. We have pre-cut 4 of them, and put a fifth aside. Now we are ready to pull out the Cricut Maker to do the rest of the cutting for us!

Start by placing the fabric on the mat. Float the fabric over the pink mat until it is lined up on the edges, and the top edge is above the top cutting line, but below the top edge of the mat. Then press it down. You can use the brayer to secure it if you like.

place fabric on mat

Now you are ready to get cutting! For most cuts, you can use a single strip of fabric for 2 mats. The first mat is a 12×24″ mat. Place the fabric on the mat. Then trim off the extra fabric from the bottom. Put this on a 12×12″ mat (or on a 12×24″ mat – you can always use a larger mat) for the second mat of that fabric.

If you didn’t print out the screen shot of the cutting instructions, I’ve got you covered! Here you go:

Fabric 1 – Mats 1 and 2
Fabric 2 – Outer border – was cut into 5.5″ strips in an earlier step.
Fabric 3 – Inner border – was cut into 2″ strips in an earlier step.
Fabric 9 – Mats 3 and 4
Fabric 6 – Mats 5 and 6
Fabric 5 – Mats 7 and 8
Fabric 4 – Mats 9 and 10
Fabric 8 – Mats 11 and 12
Fabric 7 – Mats 13 and 14
Fabric 10 – Mats 15 and 16
Fabric 11 – Set aside for binding

You probably noticed that all those fabrics are NOT in number order. This is because we want to make sure that our light and dark fabrics are balanced in the quilt. Each quilt has those lights and darks set up in a different order, so the cutting order for the fabrics can change.

Once you have your first mat ready to go, you can start cutting the rest of your fabrics! It is lovely to cut it with the Maker, because once you have the mats and fabric in order, you can let your mind wander. When cutting with a traditional rotary cutter and ruler, I have to be vigilant and remember to “measure twice, cut once” or risk a mis-cut! A miscut can mean a waste of fabric – possibly running out of fabric if the miscut is bad enough! I didn’t have that issue with the maker. I kept feeding in the mats in order, and could even hold a conversation with my 6 year old while getting all the mats cut – and I never had a miscut!

cutting fabric with maker

I’ll be back in TWO weeks with the third installment of this quilting journey. Next week I’ll be off at the Cricut Mountain Make-a-thon teaching a class on “How to Design a Quilt Block like a Pro” as well as learning from some of the other fabulous ladies (and gentleman) who are teaching at the event!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.


 

Quilting Made Easy with Riley Blake and Cricut

As an avid quilter, I love it when quilting can be made easier. There are so many steps and parts to quilting, so when some of those can be taken out for us, it makes quilting easier (and more enjoyable)! Quilt kits are a great option when looking to make a quilt. You know that all the fabric you need is in the kit (yay for no quilt math!), and you know that all the fabrics will work together wonderfully. That is why I was super excited when Cricut asked me to share a bit about their new Riley Blake Quilt kits with all of you.

Quilting Made Easy with Riley Blake and Cricut - Part 1 of 3

This post contains affiliate links. Income from these links helps to support this site at no additional cost to you.

I did a quick YouTube Live where I went over all the details of picking out the fabric (I went with the Comfort and Joy quilt kit) and picking out the pattern. The Log Cabin is a great beginner block, which is why I chose this fun Half Log Cabin.

And for those of you curious – yes, this is a project that you do need your Cricut Maker for. You need the functionality of the rotary blade in order to cut the fabric.

 

The back of the quilt kit shows you a couple of the different patterns you can make with this throw-sized quilt kit. But the great news is that you can make any of the throw sized quilts with this kit! While I love the options that they show, I also love that I have the flexibility to choose from any of the throw sized patterns.

quilt options with the comfort and joy quilt kit

You do have to buy the quilt pattern in Cricut Design Space. But once you buy it, you own the pattern. And the price really is comparable to quilt pattern prices everywhere else – with the bonus that this pattern has already been digitized to do all the cutting!

Riley Blake Half Log Cabin Quilt Pattern

The pattern includes all the Design Space files to cut the pattern, and a PDF with the step-by-step instructions to make the quilt. I’ll be going through the cutting and piecing in parts 2 and 3 of this series!

cutting the throw quilt

All those mats might be a little intimidating at first, but don’t worry! They really are broken down to make the whole process as simple as possible. This is quilting made EASY, right? And easy for us also means that it will be more fun!

cricut quilting tools

If you’re planning to make this quilt along with me, you might want to check out these great Cricut tools. I’ll be talking more about these in part 2!

wuilt kit and pattern option

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

No Sew Mini Quilt with Cricut Patterned Iron-On

If you’ve been following along with the Cricut Maker Block of the Week, you know that you need a Cricut Maker to cut the fabric for the quilt. One of the top questions that I get about the quilt is – can it be made using the Cricut Explore series of machines? Unfortunately… no. Only the Cricut Maker cuts non-bonded fabric. All of that changed when Cricut offered to send me some of their new Patterned Iron-On! I couldn’t wait to use it to show you how you can make a “cheater” version of this quilt. Even better… it is a no-sew project to put together the quilt top!

I’ve put together a step-by-step video to show you how easy it is to “quilt” without sewing a single stitch! Check out the video below!

No Sew Mini Quilt

This post contains affiliate links which help support this site at no extra cost to you.

12″x24″ Cricut Cutting Mat (blue or green)
EasyPress
Cricut EasyPress Mat
Device with Design Space
Water Soluble Pen
Scissors
Weeding Tool
Fabric (cut at least 20″x20″)
Cricut Patterned Iron-On
2 Rolls of colored Iron-On (12″x19″)  or 1 roll of SportFlex (11.8″x24″)
Your Cricut Machine (Maker or Explore series)

supplies for No Sew Mini Quilt using Cricut Patterned Iron-On

You’ll need the Cricut Design Space file I created with all 9 quilt blocks. Cut every color with a different pattern or color of Iron-On, except the purple. You don’t need to cut the purple at all, as you see in the video.

 The Patterned Iron-On is so fun to use – it is like fusing on fabric designs! There are 9 different sampler packs, each with 3 different designs – that’s over 25 patterns to choose from! You can use a single pack, mix and match packs, or mix in solid colors like I did here!

Remember, when you cut any Iron-On material, always cut it with the “pretty” side facing down, and click the toggle in Design Space that tells your Cricut Machine to reverse the design.

cut your patterned iron-on

As you weed the layers, match them up. This will help you keep track of the pieces, and make sure that you get each weeded properly.

layer the blocks as you weed

Make sure to peel off the transfer sheet before adding the next layer. Don’t remove a transfer sheet until you need to – you want to keep them on to protect the Iron-On while you’re still using heat! Without the transfer sheet, the Iron-on can melt under the heat of the EasyPress.

add layers removing transfer sheet

When you’re all done, you’ll be amazed at how much it looks like a real quilt – yet you didn’t sew a single stitch!

finished quilt top

You can use your faux quilt to make a pillow cover, you can quilt it to make a quilt, you can use it as the side of a large tote bag… there are so many ways you can use this faux quilting technique!

 

If you want to make the shirt I wear in this video, go check out the details for the Shoo Fly Quilt Block Tee!

Simple DIY Quilt Block Tee

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.