Fuzzy Clutch

Holiday season means Holiday parties. And that means holiday outfits. And Holiday accessories. I always get ready for a party, then realize that I don’t have the right bag. So I whipped up this Fuzzy Holiday Clutch. Perfect for taking to a holiday party – and also awesome for giving as a gift. This holiday clutch is the perfect gift to give to a friend this holiday season – with or without a gift card inside!

I made this fun holiday gift idea (or gift for yourself!) as part of the 99+ Handmade Holiday Gifts series that I’ve been hosting this week with Niki from 365 Days of Crafts. Scroll down to the bottom to see all the fun handmade holiday gift ideas that we, along with a bunch of crafty friends, came up with.

Fuzzy Clutch

I used a fun fuzzy fabric to make this clutch, but you can use whatever you want. If you use a less sturdy fabric, make sure to add a stiff fusible interfacing to give your clutch plenty of body.

Fat Quarter Fuzzy Fabric
Fat Quarter Lining Fabric (if you go with something bright, it will be easier to find your stuff inside)
Wide ribbon
Iron & Ironing board
Pins
Fusible Fleece
Sewing Machine
Closure of your choice (optional)

supplies for clutch

Start by cutting your fuzzy fabric, lining fabric, and fusible fleece, all 14″x17″. Cut your ribbon 17″ as well.

 

cut ribbon

Stitch the ribbon in place, on both sides, about 5″ from one side of the furry fabric.

Iron the fusible fleece to the wrong side of the lining fabric. Pin up 6″ of the lining fabric, right sides together, so that the 17″ sides become 11″. Pin, then stitch.

pin up bottom

Repeat with the fuzzy side.

Box all four corners by measuring in 1″ from the bottom corners, marking, stitching, then cutting off the excess.

box corners

Trim in the corners on both sides of the flap, both the lining and furry pieces. Measure in 2″ from the top, down to where the bottom is folded up, then cut.

trim corners

Turn the fuzzy piece right side out, then tuck into the lining so they are right sides together. Pin around the top, leaving a 4″ opening to turn through.

pin layers

Stitch all the way around, then turn through the opening. adjust the lining, then pin into place.

pin top and lining

Edge-stitch all the way around to secure the lining in place. Then draw a line from one edge of the flap to the other, and top stitch so that the flap closes easily.

stitch flap fold

Add a closure if you like, and your purse is all done!

inside of furry clutch

Simple to make, right? Great to give as a gift… or check out some of these other great handmade gift ideas:

 

Pieced and Quilted Pillow

Want a fun way to use your scraps? Or maybe you have a friend who admired a quilt you made, that you don’t want to give up… but you’d be happy to make them a simple project using the scraps from the quilt. This quilted pillow is perfect. It doesn’t take too much time to whip up a scrappy quilted pillow. And if you use bigger scraps, it takes even less time!

I created this project as part of a whole week of fun Handmade Gift ideas that Niki from 365 Days of Crafts and I have put together, along with a bunch of our crafty friends. Scroll down to the bottom of this post to check out all the awesome handmade gift ideas!

scrappy quilted pillow

Start by gathering your scraps. mine are all in strips already. If yours aren’t, cut them into strips. They don’t have to be all the same size – in fact, it looks more scrappy if they aren’t.

You’ll also need a fat quarter for the backing, Fusible Fleece, and an 18″ pillow form.

fabric for pillow

 

I divided my strips into piles based on length. Long, medium, and short. Then stitched each of the piles together into wide rows.

stitch strips

Press the rows, then trim the edges.

trim sections

Stitch the sections together, then press.

press seams

Roughly trim – basically trimming off any long edges, you’ll do a final trimming after quilting – then press to fusible fleece.

add to fusible fleece

Quilt as desired! I chose a variety of loops, swirls, lines, and pebbles.

quilt pieced top

Once you’re all quilted, trim to 18.5″x18.5″.

quilted front

 

Cut the Fat Quarter to two pieces – each 18″ by 11-ish”. Hem one 18″ side of each, place right-sides down on top of the quilted front, with the hemmed pieces towards the center, pin in place, then stitch all the way around. If you need more detail, you can check out the Easiest Pillow Cover Ever Tutorial.

Flip the pillow right-side-out, pop in the pillow form, and you’re done!

pillow quilted

Winter Big Stitch Mini Quilt

I had to come up with a quilt to gift at our December Modern Quilt Guild meeting, and for once I didn’t wait until the last minute! I still need to add a little label to this mini quilt… but other than that, it is all done!

Making a mini quilt is a fun project, and a great gift. You don’t have to commit to a large project (or commit all the  money to a large project). It also doesn’t take the kind of time commitment a big project does, either. Which is a big deal for me. I have so many projects going that I can’t commit to another big one!

modern mini holiday quilt

I was doing some traveling last month, so I decided to quilt this one using big stitch quilting. I was able to hang out on the back patio at my mom’s house, watching the kids play in the backyard and keep her company doing yard work… and get this mini quilted up! And I think that the big stitch really adds a lot of character.

Making this mini is simple. You need:

7 charm squares (5″ squares)
3/4 yard solid fabric
Batting
Perle Cotton
Big Stitch quilting needle.

I started by cutting the charm squares in half, and lining them up to decide their order.

rectangles for mini quilt

I added a small strip of blue to one side, and a large strip to the other. I basted the top, batting, and backing, sketched on a basic snowflake design, and started stitching!

add big stitch

then trim it…

trim up mini quilt

… and bind it!

bind mini quilt

This is part of a series I’m doing with Niki from 365 Days of Crafts… sharing a new gift idea each day… and we’re having some of our blogging friends share handmade gift ideas as well! By the end of the week, we’ll have over 99 gift ideas! Check them out:

 

Applique Tote

This Appliqued tote is simple to make, and makes a great gift. You can applique any design you like onto the front, quilt it however you like, and customize it for the recipient. I appliqued an umbrella on this tote, but you could just as easily applique their first initial in their favorite color. Or forget about customizing this applique tote bag for someone else – make it for yourself!

I’m sharing this project as part of a week-long series. Each day this week I’ll share a fun handmade project that makes a great gift… and I’ll be sharing projects from around the web. Together with my friend Niki from 365 Days of Crafts, and our creative friends, we’ll be sharing over 99 Handmade Holiday gifts this week!

Quilted Applique Bag Pattern

Let me show you how easy it is to create this tote!

Supplies:
1 1/4 yards of fabric
1 yard fusible fleece
scraps of fabric for applique
fusible adhesive (I used Heat n Bond Lite)
basting spray
Accuquilt Umbrella Applique Die (optional)

cut fabric

Cut 4 pieces 17″x13″.
Cut 2 pieces each 3″ wide by Width of Fabric
Cut 2 pieces of fusible fleece, each 17″x13″.

Fuse the fusible adhesive to the back of the fabric scraps, and cut out your applique. I used the Accuquilt GO! to cut mine, but you can use whatever method you like.

Select two of the 17″ x 13″ pieces to be the outside. Set the rest of the fabric aside. Fuse the fusible fleece to the back of each rectangle. Fuse the applique to the front of one. Center left-to-right. Do not center top-to-bottom. Leave about twice as much space under the applique as above the applique.

iron on applique

Quilt the front and back pieces. I did simple cross-hatch quilting.

quilted front

To make the applique stand out, don’t quilt over the applique.

quilting lines around applique

Place your front and back right-sides-together. Stitch around the sides and bottom.

pin around edges

Box the corners by marking 2″ in from each bottom corner, stitch across, then cut away the excess.

box corners

 

Using the two pieces reserved for the lining, stitch around the sides and bottom, leaving a 6″ hole along the bottom seam for turning later. Then box the corners exactly as you did in the last step.

box corners of lining

Make the handles by folding the two long strips in half, then stitching all the way down to make tubes. Turn the tubes right-sides-out to hide the seams on the inside. Stitch the handles in three places to secure – 1/8″ from each side, and down the middle. Trim the handles to your desired length.

On the lining, mark 4″ in from each seam on each side. Use these marks to pin the handles in place.

place the handles

Open up the lining. Turn the outside right-side-out, then insert into the lining.

pin on handles

Pin the layers together all the way around the top. Stitch all the way around.

Turn right side out using the hole left in the bottom of the lining. Hand-stitch the lining closed.

Machine stitch 1/8″ from the top edge, all the way around. Your bag is complete!

Quilted Applique Bag

Check out these other fun projects, and enter the giveaway below!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Christmas Tree Half-Square Triangle Quilt

I was sent a fat quarter bundle of Robert Kaufman’s Holiday Flourish fabric for a fun challenge with the other Fairfield designers. When it came in the mail, I was excited, and full of ideas. But then deadlines came, and the bundle was pushed aside, and so were the ideas.

But, projects have a magical way of becoming important again when their deadline is due… and that’s what happened with this project! I went to Quiltmarket, and when I came back, I had to get started making something with these fat quarters. I picked up a fun half-square triangle ruler at market, and was excited to use it… so I thought I’d make a fun wall hanging that looked fun and scrappy with half-square triangles.

half square triangle christmas tree quilt

finished size: 30.5 x 30.5″

 

This bundle was perfect for making the wall hanging! And at 2.5′ square, this wall hanging is the perfect size for anywhere in the house.

 

To make the wall hanging, you’ll need:
4 black fat quarters
7 gold fat quarters
1 yard backing fabric
1/4 yard for binding

From the Fat quarters, make your half-square triangles. They’re all 2″ finished triangles. Use whatever method you like to make them. I used a ruler that makes 24 at a time – you can use triangle paper, or the old method of cutting squares, drawing a line diagonally down the center, then stitching on each side. If you do this method, your cut squares will be 2 7/8″ to make the 2″ finished HSTs.

For the quarter square triangle, cut 3 4″ squares – two gold ones and one black one.
67 black-on-black HSTs
22 black-on-gold HSTs
135 gold-on-gold HSTs
1 quarter-square triangle

quilt supplies

Once you have all the HSTs made, it is time to stitch them together to make the tree shape. You can lay them out on a design wall, or the floor, and stitch them one set at a time to make your rows. Or, you can cheat like I did!

Fairfield has a new line of interfacings that will be available in stores starting January. I pulled out the lightweight fusible interfacing, and drew a 2.5″ grid on the back. Then I fused the squares onto the grid to keep them in place. Once all the squares are fused in place, I was able to stitch down a whole row at once!

stitch down rows

Once the top was pieced, I quilted the top using Fairfield Superior 80/20 Blend batting. I used a walking foot for some simple straight-line quilting. The fabric was already so busy, I decided it didn’t need busy free-motion quilting.

Then I bound it, and the quilt was done!

christmas tree quilt from half square triangles

Applique Zippered Bag

I’m on a little applique kick, making some samples, and I thought I’d show you how to make this simple applique zippered bag. Super fast and easy to make, once you get it down, you’ll be making all kinds of zippered bags!

applique zippered bag

Start with your supplies. You’ll need:
9″ zipper
2 rectangles from outer fabric – 9″x6″
2 rectangles from lining fabric – 9″x6″
Applique shape cut out with fusible web on the back.

supplies for applique zippered pouch

Fuse the heart onto one of the outer pieces, stitch in place. I used a tight zig-zag.

stitch around applique

stitch around heart

Place one outer piece and one lining piece, right sides together, with the zipper between. Stitch through all three layers. If the zipper pull gets in the way, stop stitching. With the needle down, lift up the presser foot, and carefully open or close the zipper to move the zipper pull out of the way.

Press them open, exposing the zipper. If you like, add topstitching along the top of the fabric.

press to one side

Repeat with the other set of lining and outer fabrics.

stitch on second set

Once you press open the second set, lay the fabrics so that the outer fabrics are right-sides-together, and the inner fabrics are right-sides-together, with the zipper in the middle.

put right sides together

VERY IMPORTANT: Open the zipper at least halfway. This will keep you from swearing later. Then stitch around all four sides, leaving a hole about 4″ long along the bottom of the two lining pieces.

stitch all the way around

Trim off the excess zipper, then turn the bag through the hole you left.

finish applique zippered bag

Hand-stitch the hole closed, and you’re all done!

applique bag set

 

Umbrella Applique Wall Hanging

I was working on a freelance project, and needed some applique samples. I don’t keep a lot of samples hanging around, so I whipped up a couple fun applique projects – including this umbrella applique wall hanging. If you have the umbrella applique die for the Accuquilt GO!, this is a super simple project to make.

Umbrella applique wall hangning

 

Grab some fabric and the die. I used scrap fabrics I had on hand – these are all Art Gallery Fabrics.

supplies for applique wall hanging

 

Add fusible web to the back of the applique fabrics, then cut on the Accuquilt GO!. Iron on to your center block.

iron down applique umbrella

I ironed it on first, then cut it down. That made it easier for me to center. This is 10″ wide by 11″ tall. But you can go with whatever size works for you.

center block

Cut fabric for the borders and binding.

strips for borders and binding

Stitch on borders.

sew on borders

Before stitching down the applique, I put fusible fleece on the back, and then spray basted on backing fabric. I then used a buttonhole stitch around the applique. This appliqued down the umbrella and quilted the quilt at the same time.

applique down umbrella

Once it was quilted, I trimmed it down. Before finishing the binding, I tucked a triangle into each top corner. Just a square folded on the diagonal, and stitched to the top corners. These can be used in place of a hanging sleeve – just tuck in a dowel, and hang up the quilt!

hanging corners on wall hanging

 

Fast and simple – and fun to make!

wall hanging umbrella

 

Quilt as you Go Basics

Have you tried Quilt as You go yet? I have to admit that it is one of my favorite time-saving techniques. Quilt-as-you-go allows you to piece your quilt and quilt it at the same time!

Quilt as you go basics

I’m using Fairfield’s awesome Fusi-boo Bamboo batting for today’s quilt as you go demonstration – though you could use other batting, this batting is uniquely suited to the quilt as you go technique. Check out all the details in the video!

 

English Paper Pieced Quilt Block

Have you tried English Paper Piecing? EPP is a method for hand-stitching together fabric with a paper template to keep its shape. Most English Paper Piecing you see nowadays uses hexagons (or hexies), but triangles and squares are popular shapes as well.

If you’d like to try your hand at EPP, here is a simple printable sheet that will take you through EPP basics so that you can stitch up your own project. I like to start beginners off with 1.5″ hexagons, but you can use whatever size you like. Grab the free English Paper Piecing Basics Printable here.

But once you’ve stitched together your Hexagons, where do you go next? What do you do with this masterpiece? A great option is to turn it into a quilt block for a larger quilt. I made this block as part of a charity quilt, so it will be combined with lots of other blocks to make one amazing quilt! I’ll show you how I did it.

Start with your EPP piece. You want to measure it to make sure that it is larger than the unfinished size of your block.

block ready for trimming

 

Lightly spray with spray starch or Best Press.

spray with starch

Iron flat. Since you starched the front, be sure to iron from the back – this is the easiest way to not burn the starch!

When it is as dry as possible, it still may be slightly damp to the touch.

still damp to touch

Carefully remove any remaining papers from the back of the block.

taking out papers

Press again.

pressing again

Start trimming up your block. Take as little off as possible, you can always cut it smaller later.

trimming block

Cut all four sides. My block was to be 8″ finished in the quilt, so I made it 8.5″ (to accommodate seam allowances).

back of trimmed block

Be VERY careful with your cut block. Where the seams are cut, it is very weak. Add stay-stitching at about 1/8″ to support the block. This will be inside the seam allowance, and not visible on the final quilt.

stay stitching block

Your block is ready! Make some more if you like, and stitch them together with some fun sashing for a great quilt!

Pieced Heart Pillow

Pieced heart pillow tutorial

I love decorating for Valentine’s Day. After taking down the Christmas decor, the house feels a little stark. It feels good for a little while – everything has been cleaned up and put away. But after a couple weeks I start to get antsy for some cheery colors and fun decor. Which makes these Valentine’s Day pillows perfect.

I actually made three different kinds of pillows. I’ll be sharing the others with you later in February.

pillows for Valentine's Day

To make the pieced heart pillow fronts, you need (enough for both pillows):
6 fat quarters of patterned fabric (my fabrics are all from “Scrumptious” by Bonnie and Camille for Moda)
1 fat quarter of background fabric (I used Kona Snow)

If you want to finish the pillows you need 1.5 yards backing fabric (that’s enough for both pillows), and about 4″ of velcro. You’ll also need a 20×20″ pillow form for each pillow.

I started by cutting my fabric. For each pillow you need:
From the patterned fabric:
70 – 2″ squares (assorted)
4 – 3″ squares of the same fabric (for cornerstones)

From the background fabric:
4 – 2 x 2″ squares
4 – 3.5 x 2″ strips
3 – 5 x 2″ strips
2 – 6.5 x 2″ strips
2 – 8 x 2″ strips

Lay out all the pieces. I like to lay them out on a piece of batting. The batting helps keep them in place a little bit, so a toddler running by is less likely to destroy my work. I put the pieces in a random order to get a very scrappy look.

lay out pieces

R1: 3.5″ background, 2 squares, 5″ background, 2 squares, 3.5″ background
R2: background square, 4 squares, background square, 4 squares, background square
R3: 11 squares
R4: 11 squares
R5: 11 squares
R6: background square, 9 squares, background square
R7: 3.5″ background, 7 squares, 3.5″ background
R8: 5″ background, 5 squares, 5″ background
R9: 6.5″ background, 3 squares, 6.5″ background
R10: 8″ background, 1 squares, 8″ background

I like to strip piece, so to mark my rows as I’m piecing, I use different colored pins.

mark rows when piecing

Here are all the rows pieced:

pieced into rows

I press the seams in alternate directions on the back. One row to the left, the next to the right, the next to the left… this reduces the bulk and also makes the points match up easier.

iron seams different ways

To finish the top, I measured the top and bottom, took the average of the two, and cut 3″ wide border pieces this length. I then measured the sides, took the average, cut 3″ wide border pieces this length. I added the 3″ squares to the side pieces, added the top and bottom borders, pressed, and then added the side borders. Top complete.

pieced pillow front

Quilting the pillow gives it more depth, and helps keep all that stitching in place. I layered a piece of muslin, batting, and my pillow top, and spray basted (we can have the discussion of pin basting vs. thread basting vs spray basting, but spray basting is just so much faster, so I often go with just spray basting things).

layer to quilt

You can quilt your pillow however you like. I did stitch-in-the-ditch around the border, and around the heart. Then I did a cross-hatch in the heart.

pieced heart pillows

To finish the back of the pillow, I measured my finished pillow, and cut 2 backing pieces. Each piece was the height of the pillow by 1/2 the width + 4″.

I folded the long end over 1″, then folded it over again and pressed. I selected a fun decorative stitch (no particular reason… just why not?), and stitched it down. I did the same with the other side. I added velcro to the center of each. Then I connected them using the velcro, put the whole thing right-sides-together with my pillow top, stitched all the way around, clipped, and turned right side out. There are lots of ways you can finish a pillow. This is called the “envelope” method, and I find it is one of the easiest.

back of pillow

I do like adding about 2″ of velcro to the center. Otherwise the middle tends to balloon out. Much prettier with everything all tucked in.

velcro closure