Tiger Tails Quilt

If you have always wanted to try a Dresden Plate block (or if you’ve made a bunch because you love them) then this quilt is for you! And if you’ve tried making Dresdens but they never turned out quite right then this is DOUBLY for you because the quilt uses half-dresdens which are more forgiving than full dresdens. Plus I have a video that shows you step-by-step how to make a dresden plate block using the Creative Grids 18 Degree Dresden Plate Ruler.

This post contains affiliate links.

If your local quilt shop doesn’t have this ruler, you can buy the Creative Grids 18 Degree Dresden Ruler at the Fat Quarter Shop, or you can get the ruler on Amazon. This ruler is so much fun because it makes a Dresden Plate block that has 20 points on it! That is a lot of points, and makes for such a fun block! Watch the video below to see how the Dresden Plate Quilt block is made:

If you’d like to get the Ruler of the Month Quilt pattern that I designed specifically to go with the 18 Degree Dresden Plate Ruler, you can click the button below to purchase it from my shop.

I just love how the Boscage fabrics by Katarina Roccella for Art Gallery Fabrics look in this quilt! The contrast is perfect, and I love that there is a leopard on a quilt called “Tiger Tails!” Being able to fussy-cut the prints for the centers of the Dresden blocks was so fun. And if you’re worried about the circles in this quilt – don’t be! There is no curved piecing at all, and I show you an easy way to make the applique circle centers in the video. So, be sure to watch it.

Drawstring Backpack

When we go from spring to summer, I want to ditch my everyday purse for a quick and simple option, like this drawstring backpack! You can whip one up with 3 half yard cuts of fabric and about 90 minutes. The perfect summer backpack to toss in your necessities all summer long!

This drawstring backpack is made using two purse clasps to hold the bottom of the straps in place. This makes it perfect for attaching to a fence or gate when you’re not wearing the backpack – great for keeping your things off of the ground. This summer backpack is a simple sewing project – you’ll find yourself making them for your family and friends as well!

The pattern is FREE to download – just join the mailing list here:

 

Free Pattern!

Sign up below to get the free Drawstring Backpack pattern! You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Your download link is in your inbox! If you have any problems contact me at carolina@carolinamoore.com

And check out all these other fabulous summer sewing projects:

Ice Pop Holder from Chelsea at Sew Simple Home
Beach Towel Tote from Shelly at Coral + Co.
Cap-sleeve tee from Lisa at Cucicucicoo
Sunglasses Case from Heather at Heather Handmade
Bean Bag Game from Julie at Sum of their Stories
Bucket Hat from Anne at Orange Bettie
Summer Tote from Emily at Life Sew Savory

Sparkler Quilt

The Sparkler quilt pattern looks like an intense quilt to make, but is simple to make using the Starburst 30 Degree ruler by Creative Grids. Using two red prints and two blue prints in addition to a blue and white solid adds a lot of movement and interest to this quilt.

A small quilt that is perfect to use as a BBQ table topper or a simple picnic blanket, this will be your go-to quilt for summer festivities. And you’ll never tire of getting compliments on this quilt! Pick your favorite reds and blues to make a simple quilt that has a lot of style.

To make this quilt, you’ll need the Starburst 30 Degree ruler. (Affiliate Link) You can buy the Starburst 30 Degree Ruler here. This video shows you how easy it is to use:

Purchase the Sparkler quilt using the button below:

The Turned Up Quilt

Introducing the Turned Up quilt! This fun quilt is easy to make using the Perfect Rectangle Ruler by Creative Grids. What’s that you say? No rectangles in sight on this quilt? I know! But this ruler cuts those perfect half-rectangle-triangles to complete the Turned Up quilt.

The quilt is made using seven half-yard cuts of fabric and finishes at 45″ x 45″ – making a perfect baby quilt or focal wall hanging. Use a gradient of your two favorite colors to put together this quilt that has a whole lot of interest! You’ll also get to play with partial seams when making this quilt. A super simple technique that will make you feel like a quilting rock star when you say “I made a quilt with partial seams” to someone who has no idea what that is. Because partial seams are actually super, super easy.

To learn how to use the perfect rectangle ruler used to make this quilt, watch this video:

Use this affiliate link to purchase the Perfect Rectangle Ruler. If you’d like the free download of this ruler of the month pattern (available free for a limited time – so get your download while it is still free), sign up for my email newsletter below:

 

Yay Rulers!

Sign up below to get the free Ruler of the Month pattern, Turned Up! You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Your download link is in your inbox! If you have any problems contact me at carolina@carolinamoore.com

This is such a fun quilt to stitch up as a baby quilt or wall hanging.

Learn to Foundation Paper Piece

If you’ve heard of Foundation Paper Piecing and want to know what the fuss is all about, or if you’ve never heard of Foundation Paper Piecing and now you’re curious, I can’t wait to tell you all about this really cool quilting technique! And, I created a free quilt block – the North Star Quilt Block – that you can download to practice your Foundation Paper Piecing skills. You can watch the video below where I show you how it all works.

North Star Quilt Block - Free Foundation Paper Piecing Pattern

This post contains affiliate links. Making a purchase after clicking these links may provide a small commission to this site, at no extra cost to you.

What is Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation Paper Piecing is a quilting technique. You print or draw a pattern onto paper, which becomes the foundation for your block. You then add fabric, using the lines on your paper as the guide. When you’re done, you remove the paper, and leave just the fabric and stitching.

When do you use Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation paper piecing can be used for many different kinds of blocks. Almost any pattern can be converted to foundation paper piecing – though some are better suited for it than others. Blocks that have points on them (such as an American Beauty Quilt Block) are often done with Foundation Paper Piecing. Also, quilt blocks with odd-shaped pieces are great for Foundation Paper piecing.

What is the difference between Foundation Piecing and English Paper Piecing?

Foundation Paper Piecing (also known as “paper piecing” or “foundation piecing”) is a much different technique than English Paper Piecing (also known as EPP). Foundation Piecing uses a pattern printed onto the back of lightweight papers, which are then stitched using a sewing machine. And it is great for irregular patchwork. EPP is hand sewing that is basted to heavy cardstock paper. Pieces are often very regular (hexagons and diamonds are the most common), although irregular shapes can be used with EPP.

What paper is best for Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation paper piecing can be done with regular copy paper, though it is not recommended. When foundation paper piecing, you reduce your stitch length to help perforate the paper more, and to provide more stability when you rip out the papers after finishing your piecing. Regular copy paper is more robust than what is preferred for paper piecing. There are several different types of papers specifically designed for foundation piecing. I like the Thermoweb Stitch n Sew papers. The June Tailor Perfect Piecing papers are very similar. The Carol Doak foundation papers are also very popular – they are a little harder to see through, but are the easiest to tear away when finished.

What supplies do I need for Foundation Paper Piecing?

For foundation piecing, the most important supply is the paper that you print the pattern on. You can see my recommendations above. All of these papers will print on your home printer. You’ll also need regular quilting supplies such as your sewing machine, rotary cutter and mat. I also recommend the add-a-quarter ruler, and a good quality iron.

How does Foundation Paper Piecing Work?

I filmed a video where I show you step-by-step how to foundation paper piece. Below you’ll find instructions to download the free North Star Quilt Block pattern. This is the pattern I show in the video.

To get your North Star Quilt Block pattern (both the 6″ and 12″ versions of the block), fill out the form below. I’ll send you a link to download the pattern. If you don’t see the email in your inbox within 5 minutes, please check your spam and junk folders. If you’re still having issues, you can email me at carolina@carolinamoore.com. I’m not on my email constantly, but when I see your message, I’ll make sure the pattern gets sent to you.

 

Free Pattern!

Sign up below to get the free North Star Quilt Block Pattern. You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Yay! The link to your download is on its way to your inbox! If you have any problems, please email carolina@carolinamoore.com.

I hope you enjoy learning how to foundation paper piece. This is a fabulous technique to have in your quilty toolbox. While foundation piecing isn’t the best approach for every quilt block, it is an essential skill for some of the more advanced quilt blocks.

Locked Stocking for Christmas

If you are looking for a fun teen gift, white elephant gift, or just a way to make Christmas morning even more interesting, this Locked Up Stocking is perfect! It has a flap that folds over the top and is then latched in the front and secured with a lock. You can hide the key at the end of a scavenger hunt, in a special box under the tree, on the tree itself, or use the clues included in the pattern (or make your own) for a combination lock!

This pattern is simple to follow, and fairly easy to put together. But, I filmed a video that shows you how it all works. You will still need the pattern for the stocking template, the cuff measurements, and all the clues. But this will help you with the step-by-step sewing.

The stocking has plenty of room for gift cards, stocking stuffers, or even a lump of coal. These stockings are sure to be a hit on Christmas morning!

How to Sew a Pin Cushion

These pin cushions make perfect gifts for friends and family who like to sew. They are quick and easy to make, inexpensive, and can be personalized for each recipient with specific fabrics and buttons!

This post contains affiliate links. Making a purchase through these links provides a small commission to this site at no additional cost to you.

The pattern for these pin cushions can be downloaded here for free:

 

Free Pin Cushion Pattern!

Sign up below to get the free Pin Cushion Pattern. You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Yay! The link to your download is on its way to your inbox! If you have any problems, please email carolina@carolinamoore.com.

Watch this video to see step-by-step how to make your pin cushion. Make sure that you download the pattern by signing up for my newsletter above. This will provide you with the supply list and basic cutting instructions.

Two very specific supplies that you’ll need when making the pin cushions are buttons and crushed walnut shells. You likely have a button collection (or a friend or family member with a button stash you can raid). But you may want specific buttons for these pin cushions. I purchased these sewing themed buttons from the Annie’s Catalog.

Another important supply in pin cushion making is the filling. Crushed Walnut Shells are excellent pincushion filler. You can find Crushed Walnut shells at the pet store (they are often used in reptile habitats), quilt shops also may carry crushed walnut shells for pin cushion filling. If you’re planning to make a stack of pin cushions as gifts, I found this 15lb bag of crushed walnut shells that will fill 40-45 of these pincushions.

Family Crest Quilt Block

I’m so excited to share this Family Crest Quilt block with you! This is such a simple block to make. Yes, it does have two curved units in there – but they are really not hard to make at all (I promise!). This free family crest quilt block is for this month’s Quilt Block Mania, where the theme is “family.” There are a couple dozen other quilters who are sharing family-themed quilt blocks as well. Be sure to scroll down to check out all the other family themed quilt blocks!

I know some people have heard the vicious rumor that sewing curves is hard. I want to show you how easy it is to sew curved quilt blocks, so I made this video to show you how … click the link to watch the video!

https://youtu.be/BNwqcJ72qoY

This quilt pattern is a free download for anyone signed up for my email list. Sign up below to get added, and I’ll send you the download link to get your pattern!

 

Free Quilt Block!

Sign up below to get the free Family Crest Quilt Block! You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Yay! The link to your download is on its way to your inbox! If you have any problems, please email carolina@carolinamoore.com.

About 3% of people have trouble getting added to the email list. If you don’t get the email right away (and you’ve checked your spam and promotions folders), let me know – carolina@carolinamoore.com.

As I mentioned, there are other quilt pattern designers who have designed family-themed quilt blocks. Check out all these other fun Family themed quilt blocks – some are free indefinitely, but some are free for a limited time only, so get them while you can!

Warming by the Fire
Paper Chain Family at Slice of Pi Quilts
Family is Love
Family Quote Pineapple Block by Blockofthemodotcom
Family Pumpkin Pickin’ Day
Family Crest at Always Expect Moore
Old Rocking Chair at Duck Creek Mountain Quilting
Love@Home at Stash Bandit
Sisterhood by Michelle Renee Hiatt
Glimpse of Home at Scrapdash
We Are Family by Heidi Pridemore
Family Trees at Pretty Piney Quilts
Family is the Heart of Home by QuiltFabrication
Gathering by Blue Bear Quilts
Sister’s Choice at Perkins Dry Goods
Every Family Has One at Patti’s Patchwork
Orange Blossom Quilt
Wonky Nesting Hearts
Family Photo Block
Celtic Trinity Knot by Appliqu├ęs Quilts and More
Scarecrow
Family Ring at Devoted Quilter
Tartan Block at True Blue Quilts
FindSewingStuff.com
Flying Geese Family by Tacy Gray
Family Heart by Amarar Cracions

Quilt Block Masks

Ever since I learned that it was not only going to be socially acceptable to put fabric on my face, it was actually going to be mandatory, I have been wanting to make some quilt block masks. Because if people can’t see my smiling face, then at least they can see some happy quilt blocks! Which isn’t quite the same, but for now we’ll just pretend that it is fine. Because that’s kind of what 2020 is all about … pretending that things are fine. And also wearing quilt blocks on our faces. I’m going to make that a thing.

Making a quilt block mask is pretty easy if you have some small-ish orphan blocks lying around (which I do). I grabbed a 3″ finished star that I made with the Strippy Stars Tool when I was working on the Patriot Ruler of the Month (I have a video on how the tool works if you click over to the Patriot Ruler of the Month quilt). I made the second mask using a pineapple block I had leftover from the Who Wore it Better Ruler of the Month. You can go check that one out as well for details on how to use the pineapple trim tool.

So, grab your orphan block (or make a block using the instructions linked above) and a Fat Quarter of fabric.

You’ll also need a mask pattern. This technique works with lots of different styles of masks, so if you already have a favorite pattern, you can use that one. If you don’t have a favorite mask pattern (those are words I never thought I’d be typing out and yet here we are…), I used the Craft Passion Mask for mine.

Add fabric to all four sides of the block to make sure it is big enough for the pattern. Add more than you think you’ll need. You won’t regret it.

Line up your pattern over the quilt block. You can make some choices – do you want the block more towards the front or the back? Remember you have a seam allowance on all sides.

Cut out the block according to your pattern.

Cut out the other side of the mask, then the lining pieces, and sew up as indicated on the pattern for the mask style that you chose. No other changes need to be made … and now you get to wear a quilt block on your face!!

As long as we’ll be wearing masks … they might as well be cute, right?

Summer Sew Camp!

I am so excited to announce a project I’ve been working on for weeks and weeks… Summer Sew Camp! This is a week-long set of projects designed specifically for teaching kids how to sew.

Summer Sew Camp

First of all – YES! Adults can play along as well (of course!) But I have designed this with kids in mind. Before we get down to things, let me answer a couple of questions I know you’re going to ask:

How much does Summer Sew Camp cost?

It is free. The instruction pages are free. The videos are free. And they will stay free. It is my pleasure to pass on my love of sewing to the next generation.

How old do kids need to be to participate?

That is up to you. With 100% support from an adult, I think a child as young as 6 would have fun “helping” to make these projects. And older kids will be able to make them with little or no help. If children can operate a sewing machine, wield a hot iron, and are comfortable with scissors and pins, then they can make all of these projects.

What about rotary cutters?

No rotary cutters. I made all of these project instructions and videos without using a rotary cutter. Yes, really.

When does it start?

It is all live right now. You can scroll down to watch all the videos in the playlist. Or, if you prefer, you can subscribe below to get daily emails for a week with all the links you need!

I’m sure you have more questions … I answer lots of them in this video:

If you’d like to get started, you can download the introduction and get a detailed supply list by clicking hereyou’ll also find the full instruction packet here.

I also made a quick video just for kids … so if you’d like to show your child this video (it is less than 3 minutes long) to find out if Summer Sew Camp sounds like fun to them, check it out here:

You absolutely don’t have to subscribe to access Summer Sew Camp. You can head to the link above to download the files, and head to my YouTube Channel to watch all the videos.

However, if you’re like me, your email inbox helps you organize your life. If you sign up below, I’ll send you an email with links to the supply list and intro details, and starting on Monday, you’ll get an email each day with the two lessons for that day. When the week is up, you won’t get any more emails from me unless you subscribe to my main mailing list.

 

Summer Sew Camp!

Sign up below to get notified about all things Summer Sew Camp. You will NOT be added to our main email list.

Welcome!

I always recommend buying supplies at a local quilt shop, whenever possible. Local quilt shops have experts right behind the counter who can help you with just about any project. Every place we have lived, finding my LQS (Local Quilt Shop) has been as essential as finding the grocery store and a new dentist! However, if you need a quick link to a couple of the supplies I mention in the video, you can use these affiliate links:

Pins at the Fat Quarter Shop
Fabric Scissors at The Fat Quarter Shop or Fabric Scissors on Amazon
Fabric Marking Pen at The Fat Quarter Shop or Fabric Marking Pen on Amazon
Rectangle Quilting Ruler at The Fat Quarter Shop or Rectangle Quilting Ruler on Amazon
Square Quilting Ruler at The Fat Quarter Shop or Square Quilting Ruler on Amazon
Sticky Back Velcro for Fabrics on Amazon
Sew-in Magnetic Snap on Amazon
Heavy Weight Interfacing on Amazon
Fusible Fleece at The Fat Quarter Shop or Fusible Fleece on Amazon
Polyfil Stuffing on Amazon

If you’d like to watch the whole series, it is all in this playlist. There are 13 videos and it is over 250 minutes that teaches over a dozen projects. I don’t recommend you binge it all in one day!

Or you can head to my YouTube Channel and Subscribe there.