Lady Bug Quilt Block

I’m so excited to share this Lady Bug Quilt Block with you! It is a simple pattern – great for a confident beginner – and who doesn’t love ladybugs? When I started thinking up ideas for this month’s “bug” theme, I just knew I wanted the ladybug! If you scroll down you’ll find links to lots of other fabulous bug-themed quilt blocks!

This ladybug quilt block is traditionally pieced – you don’t need to do any applique or foundation paper piecing to make this pattern. The entire block is made by cutting regular shapes and sewing them together. However, I did have to slip some eighths into this quilt. When designing quilt blocks, I like to keep to quarter, half, and whole measurements on the quilting ruler. But, to get that fabulous line down the middle of the ladybug’s back, I had to use eighth measurements on two cuts in this block. If you’re shy about cutting a fraction smaller than a quarter, then maybe you’ll love the ruler that was designed for cutting seven-eighths measurements! I have a video that shows you exactly how this ruler works:

You can purchase the seven-eighths ruler in my shop here.

You don’t need the seven-eighths ruler to make this quilt block, but you may find it handy when cutting triangles for your next half-square triangle quilt project.

The lady bug block finishes at 12″, and is completely free! Sign up here to get your free download of the Lady Bug Quilt Block:

 
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Check out all these other great bug themed quilt block patterns:

Ladybug Quilt Block by Carolina Moore
Snail by Appliques Quilts and More
Dragonfly by Mom and Me Quilting Co.
Aragog by Inquiring Quilter
Bugs in a Jar Quilt Block by Julia of Inflorescence
Christmas Beetle by Duck Creek Mountain Quilting
Bug Jar Quilt Block
Butterfly by Penny Spool Quilts
Beetle Bug by Perkins Dry Goods
Caterpillar by QuiltFabrication
Jewel Beetle by Sugar Sand Quilt Company
Bumblebee Block by BoBerry Design Co.
Arachnid at Patti’s Patchwork
Butterfly Wreath by Jessica of Blue Sky Modern Craft
Marvelous Moth by Blue Bear Quilts

Quilt Coat from Orphan Blocks

I made a quilt coat from orphan blocks, and have gotten many questions about which pattern I used, the process I used for making it, and other construction details. I’m going to detail all my quilt coat making details here so that I can use them for reference if I want to make another Quilt Coat in the future, and so you can consider them in the making of a quilt coat of your own if you like!

Quilt Coat on the back of a chair in the hotel cafe.

Here is a quick 360 view of my finished quilt coat. It was made using “orphan blocks” which is a quilter term meaning “leftover quilt blocks from past projects.” I used Art Gallery Fabrics Denim in “oatmeal” (which is a linen blend) for the background – it has some body to it, but is still a great neutral to go with the bright pinks and teals. You can watch the 360 video of the quilt coat here.

What is the best pattern for a quilt coat?

There are lots of amazing patterns for coats and quilt coats out there. The best pattern will depend on what your goals are for your quilt coat. Here is a checklist of items to consider:

  • What shape coat suits your body type?
  • Do you want a coat that is oversized, or more fitted?
  • Are you comfortable adjusting a pattern not designed for quilted fabric?
  • Are you able to print the pattern at home, and tape the pieces together?
  • What features do you want your coat to have (pockets, hood, lapel, pleats, darts, etc)?

For my quilt coat, I knew that I wanted a coat with a large hood. I’m not an expert garment sewist, but I’m comfortable sewing clothing and knew I could make adjustments “on the fly” as needed. And I really didn’t want to have to print and tape pattern pieces together. Both my printers were acting up, and the last time I printed a pattern I had to re-print it because I didn’t print it properly to scale the first time.

I went to my local JoAnn and browsed through their pattern catalogs. I wrote down the pattern numbers for multiple different coat patterns that had hoods, and then went to the pattern drawers to see which they had in stock. I ended up going with Burda 7700. This is a pattern that was designed for a knit fabric rather than a woven fabric. The biggest differences between knit and woven when sewing is that you don’t need to worry about knit fabric fraying, and that knit fabric will stretch so is much more forgiving in garments than woven fabric. Because I was using quilted woven fabrics, I made the jacket 2 sizes larger than my normal fit, and I purchased bias tape to finish off all the seams inside the quilt coat.

Messy hair, arriving at the airport in my quilt coat.

What quilt blocks to use in a quilt coat?

I took the pattern home, cut out the pieces I needed, and then put them on the floor. I went through my box of orphan blocks and selected blocks that had a similar color story. I picked blocks that had pink/teal/aqua in them, which made the coat feel more cohesive while still being scrappy. I put the blocks on top of the cut pattern pieces to get a general idea of how the coat would look, and to see if I had enough blocks.

I knew I wanted a “statement” block on the back, and I had a large dresden-style block that was perfect for a statement piece on the back of the coat. I also had quite a few flying geese blocks. I decided these were perfect for the sleeves. A flying geese block looks like a chevron, which is a common motif on the sleeves of military uniforms. If you’ve read “The DaVinci Code” you know that the chevron makes both a “blade” and “chalice” shape, so I knew I’d piece the flying geese randomly to reflect both blade/chevron as well as chalice motifs on my sleeves.

The rest of the blocks were used for the front of the coat and the hood. You’ll see that in the finished coat design I put all the star blocks on one side of the hood, and pieced scrappy 1″ half-square-triangles to use on the other side of the hood with a different background fabric. This all still matches the color story of the coat, but adds to the scrappy flavor of the quilt coat.

Improv piecing a quilt coat

Once I had an idea of which blocks I wanted to use in which section, it was a matter of improv piecing the sections. I added background fabric to the quilt blocks, piecing the blocks and background fabric together until they were larger than the pattern piece for that section of the quilt coat. It is important to remember that quilting the fabric will shrink the finished size a bit – and more quilting can shrink it more significantly – so I wanted to make sure I gave myself at least an extra inch on all sides.

It is also important to remember that the front of the quilt coat has a right and left side – so one side was pieced to fit the pattern piece, then I flipped the pattern piece over to make the opposite side.

Quilting the Quilt Coat

After all the sections were pieced, I cut backing and batting pieces, basted them, and then quilted it all together. For the backing pieces, which would become the lining of the quilt coat, I used another Art Gallery Fabrics print. It had the same color story, and was just perfect. It was a directional print (with hearts), so I was careful to make sure that I paid attention to the direction of the print. I didn’t want any upside-down hearts on the inside of my quilt coat.

I used my Baby Lock Shashiko machine to do all the quilting. This gives a hand-quilted look on the outside of the quilt coat, without needing to take the time to hand quilt any of the pieces. I may add hand-accented quilting to the quilt coat at a later date as well. I followed some of the lines on the pieced blocks to determine my lines of stitching. But it wasn’t incredibly planned out – just lines of stitching to secure the layers together and add to the overall look.

After all the sections were quilted, I pinned the pattern pieces onto the quilted sections and cut them out. The pocket pieces were cut from leftover sections, I hadn’t planned those out.

Putting the Quilt Coat together

I read through the instructions twice before starting to piece the quilt coat. After sewing each seam, I trimmed down the seam, then stitched on the bias tape to finish the seam. I was a little frustrated with the seam that connected the hood to the coat. It is such a visible seam, and to have it covered with bias tape that would stick out wasn’t going to work for me. Instead of trying to hide it, which I didn’t have the skills to do, I decided to make it a feature.

I bought larger bias tape in a teal color (all the rest of the bias tape was pink). I trimmed down the seam allowance, then pressed it open. I then used school glue to carefully baste the bias tape over the seam allowance in a large, flat band. To secure it, I used the sashiko machine to make two rows of stitches on each side. This hid the seam while creating an accent stripe at the neckline – turning what would have been an ugly part of the coat into a fun bit of flair.

QuiltCon 2022 – yes, we all wore our masks.

Once all the pieces were put together, and the seams finished with bias tape (including the seams around the pockets), I cut bias binding from the same accent fabric I had used for the accent side of the hood, and I machine bound the coat. The final machine stitches were also done with the Sashiko machine, which kept that faux-hand-stitched-look throughout the garment.

The final thing that I added was securing the pockets to the inside of the coat. The pockets were designed to float freely in the coat, but by securing them to the inside of the coat along the bottom and sides (leaving the top open) I created inside pockets. Extra pockets are always a good thing, in my book!

Oh – and I washed my quilt coat. I’d used glue and basting spray in putting it together, and I wanted to wash out as much of it as possible before wearing it for the weekend. I also knew that washing and drying it would give it a more “worn” look, and that went right along with the scrappy, hand-quilted look I had going on with my quilt coat.

Final Quilt Coat Thoughts

That is how I put my quilt coat together. I absolutely loved making it, and while it wasn’t perfect, I’m thrilled with how it came out. I had originally planned to make it in a single weekend, but it took two weekends to make – even having all the quilt blocks made beforehand! I would love to make another quilt coat in the future, if I can find the time, and decide what kinds of quilt blocks I would want to use for the quilt coat. And while I loved the final shape this pattern gave the quilt coat, I would plan to use a different pattern for my next quilt coat, just to have a completely different look. It is a lot of work, so I’d want the next one to be just as unique as this one is, but in its own way.

Everything you want to know about Pre Cut Fabrics!

If you’re a quilter or have shopped for quilting fabrics, you’ve probably come across pre-cut fabrics. They are fabulous curated bundles of fabric that are so incredibly handy when quilting! Learn all about the most common pre-cut fabrics here.

Half yard bundles, Fat Quarters, 10″ squares, 5″ squares, and 2 1/2″ strips are the most commonly used pre-cut shapes. There are other shapes that some manufacturers cut (though they don’t generally cut these specialty shapes for all their lines). These include 1 1/2″ strips, 6″ hexagons, 2 1/2″ squares, and triangles. Not every fabric manufacturer cuts every shape for their fabric lines, so it can be handy to learn how to cut your own “pre-cut” fabrics. I show you how to cut the most common sizes in this video:

If you’d like to get my simple “cheat sheet” on standard pre-cut sizes, you can get the download link by subscribing to my newsletter here:

 
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In most fabric stores, you’ll find fabric sold as “yardage” off the bolt. You select your bolts of fabric, bring them to the counter, and have an employee cut off the amount of fabric you require. Many quilters have a preferred yardage amount for any fabric they are going to add to their fabric stash – usually somewhere between 1/2 yard and 3 yards, depending on the expected use of the fabric.

Fabric off the bolt measures at least 40″ from selvedge to selvedge. Different manufacturers have different WOF (Width of Fabric). A yard is 36″. Therefore, a yard of fabric off the bolt measures 36″ by at least 40″. And a half yard will measure 18 by at least 40″.

A fat quarter is a very common cut of fabric. A quarter yard is 9″ x at least 40″. A 9″ strip is not a very usable piece of fabric, because you can’t cut a 10″ or 12″ square from it, and you can only cut 8 5″ squares, leaving a large amount of scrap behind. That is why most quilters prefer a fat quarter. A fat quarter is a half yard of fabric that has been cut in half perpendicular to the width of fabric – generally on the fold in the middle. This results in a piece of fabric that is 18″ x 20″, and a much more usable cut of fabric. You can cut a 12″ square, two 10″ squares, or twelve 5″ squares from a fat quarter. It is called a “fat” quarter because it is wider than a quarter yard that is cut right off the bolt – therefore it is “fatter.” Some people mistakenly call a fat quarter a “flat quarter.” This is a fairly common mispronunciation. Likely because “fat” and “flat” sound so similar, but also because fat quarters are often folded into sixteenths, making a flat, square-ish piece of fabric.

Fat Quarters are often sold in curated bundles. Usually these bundles are all fabrics from the same manufacturer and the same line of fabric. But, some quilt shops curate their own custom Fat Quarter bundles. And many quilt shops sell individual fat quarters – a very cost-effective way for a quilter to add favorite fabrics to their collection.

10″ squares and 5″ squares are common pre-cuts. They generally are cut and packaged by the manufacturer, and include fabrics from a single line. 42 is a common number of fabrics in a 10″ or 5″ stack, but this is not an industry standard. Packs often have repeats of different fabrics, depending on the total number of fabrics in the line.

2 1/2″ strips are a very popular pre-cut. They are used in many pre-cut friendly quilts, and a single set of 2 1/2″ strips can be used to make a quick lap-sized quilt. These strips are 2 1/2″ wide, and the length is the entire length of the fabric. 2 1/2″ strips can also make great sashing, or binding for finished quilts.

The Turned Up Quilt

Introducing the Turned Up quilt! This fun quilt is easy to make using the Perfect Rectangle Ruler by Creative Grids. What’s that you say? No rectangles in sight on this quilt? I know! But this ruler cuts those perfect half-rectangle-triangles to complete the Turned Up quilt.

The quilt is made using seven half-yard cuts of fabric and finishes at 45″ x 45″ – making a perfect baby quilt or focal wall hanging. Use a gradient of your two favorite colors to put together this quilt that has a whole lot of interest! You’ll also get to play with partial seams when making this quilt. A super simple technique that will make you feel like a quilting rock star when you say “I made a quilt with partial seams” to someone who has no idea what that is. Because partial seams are actually super, super easy.

To learn how to use the perfect rectangle ruler used to make this quilt, watch this video:

Use this affiliate link to purchase the Perfect Rectangle Ruler. If you’d like to purchase this quilt pattern, you can shop below:

This is such a fun quilt to stitch up as a baby quilt or wall hanging.

Choosing Fabric Marking Pens

If you’re looking to mark your fabric, you have a lot of choices when it comes to fabric marking pens and other tools for marking your fabric. Not all fabric marking pens are created equal, and different pens are ideal for different purposes. Are you marking the back of the fabric for half-square-triangles or are you marking the front for quilting? Is the fabric light or dark? What about options for when you are in a pinch?

When testing marking pens, you want to understand how visible they are on both light and dark fabrics, and how easy they are to remove after you no longer need the marks.

In this video, I show you what the different marking pens look like on dark and light fabric, and how well they do (or do not) erase from the fabric.

Here are affiliate links for purchasing the different pens shown in the video:
Micron Pen – permanent and used for writing on labels.
Felt-tip Water Soluble Pen – for the front or back of quilts. This one makes nice dark lines. You can also find it here.
Second option for Water Soluble Pen – for the front or back of quilts.
Fine-tip water soluble pen – for marking precise lines.
Frixion Pen – watch the video for details on using this pen – recommended for the back of the fabric only. You can also find it here. If you want several colors, you can purchase this set of pens or this set of frixion pens.
Chalk Pencil – can be used for the front or back of quilts. You can purchase lead in different colors if you like.
Mechanical Pencil – uses graphite, and can be used to mark the back of fabric.

Marking pens are a very popular way to mark fabric, but another option for marking the top of a quilt before quilting is a Hera Marker. This is a great way to draw lines for walking foot quilting, as well as mark of sections of the quilt for free motion quilting. You can watch this video to see how easy a Hera Marker is to use:

You can use these affiliate links to purchase the Hera Marker from the video or the Clover Hera Marker.

Quilting Resolutions NOT to Make

It is natural to want to make resolutions at the beginning of the year. New Year’s Resolutions and even Birthday Resolutions are always popular. And as quilters, it is natural for us to have some quilting resolutions.

But not all resolutions are created equal. I’m going to share some quilting resolutions NOT to make this year, and why. Feel free to add your thoughts in the comments!

Going on a “Fabric Diet”

Better health, including exercise or eating better are common New Year’s Resolutions. Some bring that into the quilting world with a “fabric diet.” This often means abstaining from buying new fabric for a certain period of time.

If sticking to your stash fabrics helps to push you creatively, then by all means push yourself! But if your stash doesn’t inspire you, then there may be better ways to achieve your goals.

If you want to make space on your fabric shelves or in your fabric drawers, and hope that a fabric diet will help you to make room as you sew through your stash, consider a destash instead. Sort through your fabrics, removing any that no longer bring you joy. These might be fabrics that are no longer your style or colors, or even gifted fabric that you just don’t see yourself sewing with. You can sell these fabrics in an online marketplace, or you can donate them to a quilt-making charity. This will create the space you need in your stash, without sewing something you don’t love.

Perhaps you overspent over the holidays, and are choosing a fabric diet as a way to tighten your household budget. Instead of pushing yourself to sew with fabrics you bought years ago and no longer love, you can sell these fabrics online. Then use the money you make from selling your old fabrics to purchase new fabric prints that you’re excited about. This way your old fabric can find a new life in someone else’s stash, and you don’t miss out on a new line from one of your favorite designers!

Finishing Old Projects

We quilters are known for having UFOs. These are Unfinished Objects. Also known as PIGS (Projects in Garbage sacks), PhD (Projects Half Done), or a WIP (Work in Progress). If you have a stack of projects you started and still love, it can feel incredibly satisfying to make a list of these projects, set deadlines, and finish them.

However, if you have old projects that you’re procrastinating on because you no longer love them – it is okay to release them. Finished quilt tops can be donated as charity quilts to be quilted by a longarmer and bound by a volunteer. A stack of quilt blocks can become an inspiration for someone else’s next quilt or sewing project. If you’re struggling to complete it, maybe it isn’t yours to complete. If they are dragging you down, it is okay to allow old quilts to find new life in the hands of someone else. Working on a project you don’t love makes it a WOMBAT (Waste of Money, Batting, and Time).

Sewing every day

Sewing every day could be an excellent New Year’s resolution! Making a daily date for you and your fabric to hang out each day in the New Year sounds incredible. If creating and sticking to a schedule is something that works for you, and you can set aside sewing time each day, then absolutely do it! But, if your life doesn’t allow for this kind of daily time, don’t sweat it. And if you attempt this resolution, be sure to give yourself permission to move on guilt-free if there are days where you can’t find the time to sew. You don’t want your resolution to sew something you love to make you feel guilty or bad in any way.

Don’t buy fabric or a pattern or fabric without a plan

Sometimes you come across a pattern or fabric that really speaks to you. But maybe you don’t have time to work on a new pattern now, or the pattern isn’t the right size for your next project. Maybe that fabric doesn’t work in your current quilt and doesn’t match anything in your stash. With a resolution limiting your purchases to what makes sense, you would have to skip a purchase of this new pattern and new fabric.

But quilting doesn’t have to make sense! Quilting is a hobby where you cut up perfectly good fabric just to sew it back together again. Most of us have at least one family member who doesn’t understand why we do what we do. It is okay to lean in to the nonsense and get that pattern or that fabric with no immediate plan. Sometimes the plan comes later.

What’s Your Quilting Resolution?

As you read through this list, perhaps you let go of a resolution that no longer makes sense. Or maybe you’re holding steadfast to those quilting resolutions. Whatever you choose, I hope you continue to have fun on your quilting journey!

And if you’re looking for a great way to start your Quilty New Year … consider getting your quilting tools cleaned up and ready for a year of sewing!

I Spy Quilt Book Review

I am so excited to share with you this super fun I spy book! I first heard about this book (that the ladies from On Williams Street wrote) a couple months ago, and when I saw pictures of the blocks, I squealed out loud! When my boys were little I made an i spy quilt with different fabrics I collected and traded – but making an i spy quilt with pieced blocks is such a clever idea! You can absolutely make all the different blocks for a large quilt, or you can pick and choose blocks to make for a special kiddo, such as just the animal blocks for an animal lover.

I was offered a free copy of the book to play with, which of course I said yes to! How fun are these blocks??

This post contains affiliate links. Making a purchase through these links helps support this site at no extra cost to you.

The blocks finish at 4″, which sounds really small. But, once I started sewing them I saw that it really was the perfect size. And they don’t feel small at all. They sew together very quickly, making them a great block-a-day project to do with a group of friends. Gather up some friends who all want to make the quilt, have everyone purchase the book, and then have fun making your way through the book one block at a time.

The book comes with the printable templates you need to make all the blocks. The blocks print two to a page, which is awesome for not wasting your foundation paper.

While the blocks in the book have all been made using solids, you can absolutely pick out fun prints to use in your blocks as well. I was committed to using at least one print in each, and was using mostly fabrics from my scrap bin. It was super fun finding prints that worked for each block.

To make the blocks, or the whole quilt, you will need:

I Spy Book (For 10% off use the coupon code ISPYBLOGHOP – good through Dec 16.)
Foundation Paper for printing the patterns (Quiet Play and Carol Doak both have great foundation papers)
Add-a-quarter ruler in yellow or in pink (and you may want the add-an-eighth ruler for the more detailed blocks)

If you’ve never done foundation paper piecing before, I have a video that will take you through the basics of how Foundation Paper Piecing works. It is such a fun technique for making “non-regular” shaped blocks like this.

Some others got to check out this super fun book as well, and are sharing their thoughts – go see what they have to say!

November 30: Kimie and Missy of On WIlliams Street December 1: Audrey Mann of The Cloth Parcel December 2: Jen Frost of Faith and Fabric December 3: Bea Lee of Bea a Quilter December 4: Sarah Goer of Sarah Goer Quilts December 5: Joanne Harris of Quilts by Joan December 6: Susan Smith of Stitched by Susan December 7: Simone Fisher of Simone Quilts December 8: Lissa LaGreca of Lovingly Lissa December 9: Catalina Barcelo of Amarar Creacions December 10: Laura Strickland of Orange Blossom Quilts December 11: Laura Piland of Slice of Pi Quilts December 12: Carolina Moore of Always Expect Moore December 13: Tammy Silvers of Tamarinis December 14: Kim Niedzwiecki of Go Go Kim

Learn to Foundation Paper Piece

If you’ve heard of Foundation Paper Piecing and want to know what the fuss is all about, or if you’ve never heard of Foundation Paper Piecing and now you’re curious, I can’t wait to tell you all about this really cool quilting technique! And, I created a free quilt block – the North Star Quilt Block – that you can download to practice your Foundation Paper Piecing skills. You can watch the video below where I show you how it all works.

North Star Quilt Block - Free Foundation Paper Piecing Pattern

This post contains affiliate links. Making a purchase after clicking these links may provide a small commission to this site, at no extra cost to you.

What is Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation Paper Piecing is a quilting technique. You print or draw a pattern onto paper, which becomes the foundation for your block. You then add fabric, using the lines on your paper as the guide. When you’re done, you remove the paper, and leave just the fabric and stitching.

When do you use Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation paper piecing can be used for many different kinds of blocks. Almost any pattern can be converted to foundation paper piecing – though some are better suited for it than others. Blocks that have points on them (such as an American Beauty Quilt Block) are often done with Foundation Paper Piecing. Also, quilt blocks with odd-shaped pieces are great for Foundation Paper piecing.

What is the difference between Foundation Piecing and English Paper Piecing?

Foundation Paper Piecing (also known as “paper piecing” or “foundation piecing”) is a much different technique than English Paper Piecing (also known as EPP). Foundation Piecing uses a pattern printed onto the back of lightweight papers, which are then stitched using a sewing machine. And it is great for irregular patchwork. EPP is hand sewing that is basted to heavy cardstock paper. Pieces are often very regular (hexagons and diamonds are the most common), although irregular shapes can be used with EPP.

What paper is best for Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation paper piecing can be done with regular copy paper, though it is not recommended. When foundation paper piecing, you reduce your stitch length to help perforate the paper more, and to provide more stability when you rip out the papers after finishing your piecing. Regular copy paper is more robust than what is preferred for paper piecing. There are several different types of papers specifically designed for foundation piecing. I like the Thermoweb Stitch n Sew papers. The June Tailor Perfect Piecing papers are very similar. The Carol Doak foundation papers are also very popular – they are a little harder to see through, but are the easiest to tear away when finished.

What supplies do I need for Foundation Paper Piecing?

For foundation piecing, the most important supply is the paper that you print the pattern on. You can see my recommendations above. All of these papers will print on your home printer. You’ll also need regular quilting supplies such as your sewing machine, rotary cutter and mat. I also recommend the add-a-quarter ruler, and a good quality iron.

How does Foundation Paper Piecing Work?

I filmed a video where I show you step-by-step how to foundation paper piece. Below you’ll find instructions to download the free North Star Quilt Block pattern. This is the pattern I show in the video.

To get your North Star Quilt Block pattern (both the 6″ and 12″ versions of the block), fill out the form below. I’ll send you a link to download the pattern. If you don’t see the email in your inbox within 5 minutes, please check your spam and junk folders. If you’re still having issues, you can email me at carolina@carolinamoore.com. I’m not on my email constantly, but when I see your message, I’ll make sure the pattern gets sent to you.

 

Free Pattern!

Sign up below to get the free North Star Quilt Block Pattern. You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Yay! The link to your download is on its way to your inbox! If you have any problems, please email carolina@carolinamoore.com.

I hope you enjoy learning how to foundation paper piece. This is a fabulous technique to have in your quilty toolbox. While foundation piecing isn’t the best approach for every quilt block, it is an essential skill for some of the more advanced quilt blocks.

Best Gifts for Quilters

If you’ve got a quilter in your life, and you’re looking for a gift to give them for a holiday, birthday, or just because … I’ve got you covered! I’ve sorted these gifts into different categories to help you out, and if I’ve been able to find the gift in multiple places, I’m giving you multiple links so that you can compare price and shipping options.

This post contains affiliate links which provide a small commission to this site when you purchase through these links.

If you’re more of a home-shopping-network type shopper, I’ve shared many of these gift ideas in this video, in which I give you a more detailed look at many of these items.

Let’s get started on all the links!

Best Splurge Gifts for Quilters

If you have an extra special quilter in your life, or you’re feeling super generous this year, these spurge gifts are always appreciated! Quilters are known for our generosity in giving away quilts, and we often feel guilty for spending big dollars on ourselves. Treat your quilter with something from this list!

Sewing Machine – I love Baby Lock machines. They are easy to care for, and high quality. For a beginner, or a quilter who wants a machine for travel, the Baby Lock Jubilant is a great choice. You may want to check out Baby Lock’s Embroidery Machines for a quilter who wants to step up their game. I’ve added the Baby Lock Sashiko machine to my wishlist this year – it is a specialty machine just for quilting, but gives a hand-quilted look for a lot less work!

Accuquilt Go! Cutter. Accuquilt is a cutting machine designed specifically for quilters. They have so many different specialty quilting dies designed to make cutting fabric easier and more accurate. So that quilters can get to their favorite part – the sewing! The Accuquilt Go! Me is great for someone starting out. However, if you have a serious quilter on your hands, the Ready Set Go! Cutting System is an awesome splurge. Accuquilt does an amazing job of offering free patterns that compliment their dies, so this is really an investment that pays off in the long run.

Oliso Iron. Oliso is a well known brand in the quilting world. While the price point of an Oliso iron makes it a splurge, it is a high-quality iron that will last your quilter for years and years! It gets beautifully hot and makes great steam – though it can be used without steam for a steam-less quilter. Pair it with a wool pressing mat and a hot iron rest for a very thoughtful gift.

Creative Grids Stripology XL Ruler. Splurge on the big one! This ruler cuts strips, squares, squares up blocks, and more. It is a huge time saver and such a fun ruler! And yes – I absolutely own one of these!

Gifts Every Quilter will Love

These gifts won’t be as big of a splurge as the items on the list above, but any of these would absolutely be appreciated by a quilter.

Gift Card to their local Quilt shop
Oliso Mini Iron – available in four colors!
Wool Pressing Mat (also available here) (and available here)
Spot on Dot (also available here)
Creative Grids Specialty Rulers – Creative Grids has tons of specialty rulers! My favorites are the Strippy Star, Curvy Log Cabin, and Kitty Cornered rulers.
Plan to Quilt – this great book will help a quilter track their projects – use code MOORE for 10% off!

Best Gifts for a New Quilter

For someone just starting out, these gifts will be appreciated!

Gift Card to their local Quilt shop
Cutting Mat
Rotary Cutter – the Olfa Splash is my favorite (also available here) (find it here in pink)
Replacement 45mm Rotary Blades (also available here) (also available here)
Good Scissors (also available for left-handed quilters)
Replacement Sewing Machine Needles (these are also a good option)
Good Thread – Madiera is what I’ve been using.
Good Quality fabric – if you don’t know their favorite fabric designer, you can’t go wrong with AGF Elements in their favorite colors.
Good Rulers – this Creative Grids Quilting Ruler and Creative Grids Square are great for beginners.
Machine cleaning set

Best Stocking Stuffers for Quilters

If you’re looking to fill a quilter’s stocking, or you’re looking for a great gift to give a friend, these small gifts go a long way! And, if you’re a quilter yourself, make sure to add one to your cart for you as well! For a fun surprise, you can tuck the gift into a locked stocking made with my locked stocking pattern!

Mini Wool Pressing Mat
Spot on Dot (also available here)
(or the Spot on Dot Single Dot)

Mini Creative Grids Ruler
Creative Grids Seam Guide
Alphabitties
Seam Roller
Pin Points enamel pins for Quilters and Fiber Artists
“Handmade” hardware
Thread cutter caddy (also available here)

Hot Iron Rest (also available here)
Dritz Number pins (also available here)
Clover Wonder Clips
Scissors Mug
Perfect Pincushion
Purple Thang (also available here) (and here too)
Madiera Thread
Stash and Store (also available here)
Olfa Splash rotary cutter (also available here) (find it here in pink)
Machine cleaning set
Mini Scissors – there are so many awesome mini scissors, and one can never have enough! I have a small collection going, and always want more! Here are some fun options:
* Covered Scissors
* Wood Handled Mini Scissors
* Mini Heirloom Scissors
* Gold Unicorn Scissors
* Rainbow Unicorn Scissors
* Cat Embroidery Scissors
* Bronze Warm Crochet Scissors
* Pink Flamingo Scissors
* Christmas Themed Scissors

Gifts that are Sewing Themed

Bee in my Bonnet Puzzle
Thimble Blossoms Puzzle
Festival of Quilts Puzzle
Pin Points enamel pins for Quilters and Fiber Artists
Password Keeper (also available here)
Smartphone Lounger
Scissors Mug
“Quilt” Popsockets
Quilt Calendar

The Knit Quilt

When I saw the AGF Hooked Fabric collection, I knew I wanted to make a quilt that made reference to fiber crafts beyond quilting. Which is how I came up with the knit quilt. Yes, I know that “hooked” refers to crochet, and that crochet and knitting are two different things. So, this is an imperfect reference. I apologize in advance to any knitters or crocheters who may think that I don’t know the difference. I do. My mom tried to teach me. And while I don’t have any yarn skills, she was able to teach me that there is a difference between knit and crochet.

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This quilt is incredibly easy to make. Only marginally more work than stitching squares together to make a quilt, and so much more impact! This pattern will become your go-to pattern for making baby quilts and comfort quilts. It uses half yard cuts of fabric, and has very little waste. It is quick to cut, and quick to piece. You can make a quilt from start to finish in a day using this pattern. It is that simple!

The Knit Quilt uses the Creative Grids 60 Degree Diamond Mini. You can get yours at your local quilt shop. If you don’t have a local shop, you can buy yours at the Fat Quarter Shop or get your 60 Degree Diamond Mini on Amazon.

In this video, I show you how easy it is to create so many different shapes using this ruler. For a small piece of plexiglass, it sure has a lot of ways to use it!!

The Knit Quilt is a Ruler of the Month Quilt. You can purchase the Knit quilt here:

Make sure to check out all the other Ruler of the Month Quilts.