The Turned Up Quilt

Introducing the Turned Up quilt! This fun quilt is easy to make using the Perfect Rectangle Ruler by Creative Grids. What’s that you say? No rectangles in sight on this quilt? I know! But this ruler cuts those perfect half-rectangle-triangles to complete the Turned Up quilt.

The quilt is made using seven half-yard cuts of fabric and finishes at 45″ x 45″ – making a perfect baby quilt or focal wall hanging. Use a gradient of your two favorite colors to put together this quilt that has a whole lot of interest! You’ll also get to play with partial seams when making this quilt. A super simple technique that will make you feel like a quilting rock star when you say “I made a quilt with partial seams” to someone who has no idea what that is. Because partial seams are actually super, super easy.

To learn how to use the perfect rectangle ruler used to make this quilt, watch this video:

Use this affiliate link to purchase the Perfect Rectangle Ruler. If you’d like the free download of this ruler of the month pattern (available free for a limited time – so get your download while it is still free), sign up for my email newsletter below:

 

Yay Rulers!

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This is such a fun quilt to stitch up as a baby quilt or wall hanging.

Choosing Fabric Marking Pens

If you’re looking to mark your fabric, you have a lot of choices when it comes to fabric marking pens and other tools for marking your fabric. Not all fabric marking pens are created equal, and different pens are ideal for different purposes. Are you marking the back of the fabric for half-square-triangles or are you marking the front for quilting? Is the fabric light or dark? What about options for when you are in a pinch?

When testing marking pens, you want to understand how visible they are on both light and dark fabrics, and how easy they are to remove after you no longer need the marks.

In this video, I show you what the different marking pens look like on dark and light fabric, and how well they do (or do not) erase from the fabric.

Here are affiliate links for purchasing the different pens shown in the video:
Micron Pen – permanent and used for writing on labels.
Felt-tip Water Soluble Pen – for the front or back of quilts. This one makes nice dark lines. You can also find it here.
Second option for Water Soluble Pen – for the front or back of quilts.
Fine-tip water soluble pen – for marking precise lines.
Frixion Pen – watch the video for details on using this pen – recommended for the back of the fabric only. You can also find it here. If you want several colors, you can purchase this set of pens or this set of frixion pens.
Chalk Pencil – can be used for the front or back of quilts. You can purchase lead in different colors if you like.
Mechanical Pencil – uses graphite, and can be used to mark the back of fabric.

Marking pens are a very popular way to mark fabric, but another option for marking the top of a quilt before quilting is a Hera Marker. This is a great way to draw lines for walking foot quilting, as well as mark of sections of the quilt for free motion quilting. You can watch this video to see how easy a Hera Marker is to use:

You can use these affiliate links to purchase the Hera Marker from the video or the Clover Hera Marker.

Quilting Resolutions NOT to Make

It is natural to want to make resolutions at the beginning of the year. New Year’s Resolutions and even Birthday Resolutions are always popular. And as quilters, it is natural for us to have some quilting resolutions.

But not all resolutions are created equal. I’m going to share some quilting resolutions NOT to make this year, and why. Feel free to add your thoughts in the comments!

Going on a “Fabric Diet”

Better health, including exercise or eating better are common New Year’s Resolutions. Some bring that into the quilting world with a “fabric diet.” This often means abstaining from buying new fabric for a certain period of time.

If sticking to your stash fabrics helps to push you creatively, then by all means push yourself! But if your stash doesn’t inspire you, then there may be better ways to achieve your goals.

If you want to make space on your fabric shelves or in your fabric drawers, and hope that a fabric diet will help you to make room as you sew through your stash, consider a destash instead. Sort through your fabrics, removing any that no longer bring you joy. These might be fabrics that are no longer your style or colors, or even gifted fabric that you just don’t see yourself sewing with. You can sell these fabrics in an online marketplace, or you can donate them to a quilt-making charity. This will create the space you need in your stash, without sewing something you don’t love.

Perhaps you overspent over the holidays, and are choosing a fabric diet as a way to tighten your household budget. Instead of pushing yourself to sew with fabrics you bought years ago and no longer love, you can sell these fabrics online. Then use the money you make from selling your old fabrics to purchase new fabric prints that you’re excited about. This way your old fabric can find a new life in someone else’s stash, and you don’t miss out on a new line from one of your favorite designers!

Finishing Old Projects

We quilters are known for having UFOs. These are Unfinished Objects. Also known as PIGS (Projects in Garbage sacks), PhD (Projects Half Done), or a WIP (Work in Progress). If you have a stack of projects you started and still love, it can feel incredibly satisfying to make a list of these projects, set deadlines, and finish them.

However, if you have old projects that you’re procrastinating on because you no longer love them – it is okay to release them. Finished quilt tops can be donated as charity quilts to be quilted by a longarmer and bound by a volunteer. A stack of quilt blocks can become an inspiration for someone else’s next quilt or sewing project. If you’re struggling to complete it, maybe it isn’t yours to complete. If they are dragging you down, it is okay to allow old quilts to find new life in the hands of someone else. Working on a project you don’t love makes it a WOMBAT (Waste of Money, Batting, and Time).

Sewing every day

Sewing every day could be an excellent New Year’s resolution! Making a daily date for you and your fabric to hang out each day in the New Year sounds incredible. If creating and sticking to a schedule is something that works for you, and you can set aside sewing time each day, then absolutely do it! But, if your life doesn’t allow for this kind of daily time, don’t sweat it. And if you attempt this resolution, be sure to give yourself permission to move on guilt-free if there are days where you can’t find the time to sew. You don’t want your resolution to sew something you love to make you feel guilty or bad in any way.

Don’t buy fabric or a pattern or fabric without a plan

Sometimes you come across a pattern or fabric that really speaks to you. But maybe you don’t have time to work on a new pattern now, or the pattern isn’t the right size for your next project. Maybe that fabric doesn’t work in your current quilt and doesn’t match anything in your stash. With a resolution limiting your purchases to what makes sense, you would have to skip a purchase of this new pattern and new fabric.

But quilting doesn’t have to make sense! Quilting is a hobby where you cut up perfectly good fabric just to sew it back together again. Most of us have at least one family member who doesn’t understand why we do what we do. It is okay to lean in to the nonsense and get that pattern or that fabric with no immediate plan. Sometimes the plan comes later.

What’s Your Quilting Resolution?

As you read through this list, perhaps you let go of a resolution that no longer makes sense. Or maybe you’re holding steadfast to those quilting resolutions. Whatever you choose, I hope you continue to have fun on your quilting journey!

And if you’re looking for a great way to start your Quilty New Year … consider getting your quilting tools cleaned up and ready for a year of sewing!

I Spy Quilt Book Review

I am so excited to share with you this super fun I spy book! I first heard about this book (that the ladies from On Williams Street wrote) a couple months ago, and when I saw pictures of the blocks, I squealed out loud! When my boys were little I made an i spy quilt with different fabrics I collected and traded – but making an i spy quilt with pieced blocks is such a clever idea! You can absolutely make all the different blocks for a large quilt, or you can pick and choose blocks to make for a special kiddo, such as just the animal blocks for an animal lover.

I was offered a free copy of the book to play with, which of course I said yes to! How fun are these blocks??

This post contains affiliate links. Making a purchase through these links helps support this site at no extra cost to you.

The blocks finish at 4″, which sounds really small. But, once I started sewing them I saw that it really was the perfect size. And they don’t feel small at all. They sew together very quickly, making them a great block-a-day project to do with a group of friends. Gather up some friends who all want to make the quilt, have everyone purchase the book, and then have fun making your way through the book one block at a time.

The book comes with the printable templates you need to make all the blocks. The blocks print two to a page, which is awesome for not wasting your foundation paper.

While the blocks in the book have all been made using solids, you can absolutely pick out fun prints to use in your blocks as well. I was committed to using at least one print in each, and was using mostly fabrics from my scrap bin. It was super fun finding prints that worked for each block.

To make the blocks, or the whole quilt, you will need:

I Spy Book (For 10% off use the coupon code ISPYBLOGHOP – good through Dec 16.)
Foundation Paper for printing the patterns (Quiet Play and Carol Doak both have great foundation papers)
Add-a-quarter ruler in yellow or in pink (and you may want the add-an-eighth ruler for the more detailed blocks)

If you’ve never done foundation paper piecing before, I have a video that will take you through the basics of how Foundation Paper Piecing works. It is such a fun technique for making “non-regular” shaped blocks like this.

Some others got to check out this super fun book as well, and are sharing their thoughts – go see what they have to say!

November 30: Kimie and Missy of On WIlliams Street December 1: Audrey Mann of The Cloth Parcel December 2: Jen Frost of Faith and Fabric December 3: Bea Lee of Bea a Quilter December 4: Sarah Goer of Sarah Goer Quilts December 5: Joanne Harris of Quilts by Joan December 6: Susan Smith of Stitched by Susan December 7: Simone Fisher of Simone Quilts December 8: Lissa LaGreca of Lovingly Lissa December 9: Catalina Barcelo of Amarar Creacions December 10: Laura Strickland of Orange Blossom Quilts December 11: Laura Piland of Slice of Pi Quilts December 12: Carolina Moore of Always Expect Moore December 13: Tammy Silvers of Tamarinis December 14: Kim Niedzwiecki of Go Go Kim

Learn to Foundation Paper Piece

If you’ve heard of Foundation Paper Piecing and want to know what the fuss is all about, or if you’ve never heard of Foundation Paper Piecing and now you’re curious, I can’t wait to tell you all about this really cool quilting technique! And, I created a free quilt block – the North Star Quilt Block – that you can download to practice your Foundation Paper Piecing skills. You can watch the video below where I show you how it all works.

North Star Quilt Block - Free Foundation Paper Piecing Pattern

This post contains affiliate links. Making a purchase after clicking these links may provide a small commission to this site, at no extra cost to you.

What is Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation Paper Piecing is a quilting technique. You print or draw a pattern onto paper, which becomes the foundation for your block. You then add fabric, using the lines on your paper as the guide. When you’re done, you remove the paper, and leave just the fabric and stitching.

When do you use Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation paper piecing can be used for many different kinds of blocks. Almost any pattern can be converted to foundation paper piecing – though some are better suited for it than others. Blocks that have points on them (such as an American Beauty Quilt Block) are often done with Foundation Paper Piecing. Also, quilt blocks with odd-shaped pieces are great for Foundation Paper piecing.

What is the difference between Foundation Piecing and English Paper Piecing?

Foundation Paper Piecing (also known as “paper piecing” or “foundation piecing”) is a much different technique than English Paper Piecing (also known as EPP). Foundation Piecing uses a pattern printed onto the back of lightweight papers, which are then stitched using a sewing machine. And it is great for irregular patchwork. EPP is hand sewing that is basted to heavy cardstock paper. Pieces are often very regular (hexagons and diamonds are the most common), although irregular shapes can be used with EPP.

What paper is best for Foundation Paper Piecing?

Foundation paper piecing can be done with regular copy paper, though it is not recommended. When foundation paper piecing, you reduce your stitch length to help perforate the paper more, and to provide more stability when you rip out the papers after finishing your piecing. Regular copy paper is more robust than what is preferred for paper piecing. There are several different types of papers specifically designed for foundation piecing. I like the Thermoweb Stitch n Sew papers. The June Tailor Perfect Piecing papers are very similar. The Carol Doak foundation papers are also very popular – they are a little harder to see through, but are the easiest to tear away when finished.

What supplies do I need for Foundation Paper Piecing?

For foundation piecing, the most important supply is the paper that you print the pattern on. You can see my recommendations above. All of these papers will print on your home printer. You’ll also need regular quilting supplies such as your sewing machine, rotary cutter and mat. I also recommend the add-a-quarter ruler, and a good quality iron.

How does Foundation Paper Piecing Work?

I filmed a video where I show you step-by-step how to foundation paper piece. Below you’ll find instructions to download the free North Star Quilt Block pattern. This is the pattern I show in the video.

To get your North Star Quilt Block pattern (both the 6″ and 12″ versions of the block), fill out the form below. I’ll send you a link to download the pattern. If you don’t see the email in your inbox within 5 minutes, please check your spam and junk folders. If you’re still having issues, you can email me at carolina@carolinamoore.com. I’m not on my email constantly, but when I see your message, I’ll make sure the pattern gets sent to you.

 

Free Pattern!

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I hope you enjoy learning how to foundation paper piece. This is a fabulous technique to have in your quilty toolbox. While foundation piecing isn’t the best approach for every quilt block, it is an essential skill for some of the more advanced quilt blocks.

Best Gifts for Quilters

If you’ve got a quilter in your life, and you’re looking for a gift to give them for a holiday, birthday, or just because … I’ve got you covered! I’ve sorted these gifts into different categories to help you out, and if I’ve been able to find the gift in multiple places, I’m giving you multiple links so that you can compare price and shipping options.

This post contains affiliate links which provide a small commission to this site when you purchase through these links.

If you’re more of a home-shopping-network type shopper, I’ve shared many of these gift ideas in this video, in which I give you a more detailed look at many of these items.

Let’s get started on all the links!

Best Splurge Gifts for Quilters

If you have an extra special quilter in your life, or you’re feeling super generous this year, these spurge gifts are always appreciated! Quilters are known for our generosity in giving away quilts, and we often feel guilty for spending big dollars on ourselves. Treat your quilter with something from this list!

Sewing Machine – I love Baby Lock machines. They are easy to care for, and high quality. For a beginner, or a quilter who wants a machine for travel, the Baby Lock Jubilant is a great choice. You may want to check out Baby Lock’s Embroidery Machines for a quilter who wants to step up their game. I’ve added the Baby Lock Sashiko machine to my wishlist this year – it is a specialty machine just for quilting, but gives a hand-quilted look for a lot less work!

Accuquilt Go! Cutter. Accuquilt is a cutting machine designed specifically for quilters. They have so many different specialty quilting dies designed to make cutting fabric easier and more accurate. So that quilters can get to their favorite part – the sewing! The Accuquilt Go! Me is great for someone starting out. However, if you have a serious quilter on your hands, the Ready Set Go! Cutting System is an awesome splurge. Accuquilt does an amazing job of offering free patterns that compliment their dies, so this is really an investment that pays off in the long run.

Oliso Iron. Oliso is a well known brand in the quilting world. While the price point of an Oliso iron makes it a splurge, it is a high-quality iron that will last your quilter for years and years! It gets beautifully hot and makes great steam – though it can be used without steam for a steam-less quilter. Pair it with a wool pressing mat and a hot iron rest for a very thoughtful gift.

Creative Grids Stripology XL Ruler. Splurge on the big one! This ruler cuts strips, squares, squares up blocks, and more. It is a huge time saver and such a fun ruler! And yes – I absolutely own one of these!

Gifts Every Quilter will Love

These gifts won’t be as big of a splurge as the items on the list above, but any of these would absolutely be appreciated by a quilter.

Gift Card to their local Quilt shop
Oliso Mini Iron – available in four colors!
Wool Pressing Mat (also available here) (and available here)
Spot on Dot (also available here)
Creative Grids Specialty Rulers – Creative Grids has tons of specialty rulers! My favorites are the Strippy Star, Curvy Log Cabin, and Kitty Cornered rulers.
Plan to Quilt – this great book will help a quilter track their projects – use code MOORE for 10% off!

Best Gifts for a New Quilter

For someone just starting out, these gifts will be appreciated!

Gift Card to their local Quilt shop
Cutting Mat
Rotary Cutter – the Olfa Splash is my favorite (also available here) (find it here in pink)
Replacement 45mm Rotary Blades (also available here) (also available here)
Good Scissors (also available for left-handed quilters)
Replacement Sewing Machine Needles (these are also a good option)
Good Thread – Madiera is what I’ve been using.
Good Quality fabric – if you don’t know their favorite fabric designer, you can’t go wrong with AGF Elements in their favorite colors.
Good Rulers – this Creative Grids Quilting Ruler and Creative Grids Square are great for beginners.
Machine cleaning set

Best Stocking Stuffers for Quilters

If you’re looking to fill a quilter’s stocking, or you’re looking for a great gift to give a friend, these small gifts go a long way! And, if you’re a quilter yourself, make sure to add one to your cart for you as well! For a fun surprise, you can tuck the gift into a locked stocking made with my locked stocking pattern!

Mini Wool Pressing Mat
Spot on Dot (also available here)
(or the Spot on Dot Single Dot)

Mini Creative Grids Ruler
Creative Grids Seam Guide
Alphabitties
Seam Roller
Pin Points enamel pins for Quilters and Fiber Artists
“Handmade” hardware
Thread cutter caddy (also available here)

Hot Iron Rest (also available here)
Dritz Number pins (also available here)
Clover Wonder Clips
Scissors Mug
Perfect Pincushion
Purple Thang (also available here) (and here too)
Madiera Thread
Stash and Store (also available here)
Olfa Splash rotary cutter (also available here) (find it here in pink)
Machine cleaning set
Mini Scissors – there are so many awesome mini scissors, and one can never have enough! I have a small collection going, and always want more! Here are some fun options:
* Covered Scissors
* Wood Handled Mini Scissors
* Mini Heirloom Scissors
* Gold Unicorn Scissors
* Rainbow Unicorn Scissors
* Cat Embroidery Scissors
* Bronze Warm Crochet Scissors
* Pink Flamingo Scissors
* Christmas Themed Scissors

Gifts that are Sewing Themed

Bee in my Bonnet Puzzle
Thimble Blossoms Puzzle
Festival of Quilts Puzzle
Pin Points enamel pins for Quilters and Fiber Artists
Password Keeper (also available here)
Smartphone Lounger
Scissors Mug
“Quilt” Popsockets
Quilt Calendar

The Knit Quilt

When I saw the AGF Hooked Fabric collection, I knew I wanted to make a quilt that made reference to fiber crafts beyond quilting. Which is how I came up with the knit quilt. Yes, I know that “hooked” refers to crochet, and that crochet and knitting are two different things. So, this is an imperfect reference. I apologize in advance to any knitters or crocheters who may think that I don’t know the difference. I do. My mom tried to teach me. And while I don’t have any yarn skills, she was able to teach me that there is a difference between knit and crochet.

This post contains affiliate links which provide a small commission to this site at no additional cost to you when purchases are made through these links.

This quilt is incredibly easy to make. Only marginally more work than stitching squares together to make a quilt, and so much more impact! This pattern will become your go-to pattern for making baby quilts and comfort quilts. It uses half yard cuts of fabric, and has very little waste. It is quick to cut, and quick to piece. You can make a quilt from start to finish in a day using this pattern. It is that simple!

The Knit Quilt uses the Creative Grids 60 Degree Diamond Mini. You can get yours at your local quilt shop. If you don’t have a local shop, you can buy yours at the Fat Quarter Shop or get your 60 Degree Diamond Mini on Amazon.

In this video, I show you how easy it is to create so many different shapes using this ruler. For a small piece of plexiglass, it sure has a lot of ways to use it!!

The Knit Quilt is a Ruler of the Month Quilt. You can purchase the Knit quilt here:

Make sure to check out all the other Ruler of the Month Quilts.

English Paper Piecing with Accuquilt

I’m so excited to share with you the newest Accuquilt Qube, which was designed specifically for English Paper Piecing. I got early access to these dies as I worked with Accuquilt to create patterns for the launch, and can’t wait to share all that I have been up to! If you’ve been around a while, you know that I love English Paper Piecing … so this project was an absolute joy for me to work on!

Throughout this post I’ll share links to products and projects. Most of these are affiliate links, so if you make a purchase after clicking one of these links I will get a small commission from the sale.

This EPP Qube is a set of dies designed for English Paper Piecing that are incredibly well thought out. The set includes 8 dies – four for cutting the papers, and four for cutting the the fabric. The four shapes are a triangle, diamond, half-hexagon, and (of course) a hexagon. All the pieces have 1″ finished sides (except for the half-hexagon which has a long side that is 2″), and all the fabric is cut with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Because all of the units have a 1″ finished size, they all fit together perfectly!

I did a full unboxing video to show you all about the Accuquilt GO! EPP Qube:

How the Accuquilt Works

If you’re not familiar with the Accuquilt system, it is designed for quilters to help us with cutting fabric quickly and accurately. Accuquilt has lots of different quilting shapes – from traditional shapes like squares and half square triangles, to applique shapes like hearts and umbrellas, to specialty shapes like the double wedding ring.

To use the dies, you need an Accuquilt GO! cutting machine. There are different sizes of the machine, to accommodate the different sizes of dies. You can use the smaller dies in the larger machines, but you can’t fit the larger dies in the smaller machines. The EPP Qubes are just 6 inches, so you can use any of the Accuquilt GO! machines with the EPP dies.

I have the Accuquilt GO! fabric cutter, but the Accuquilt GO! me is great for a beginner, and can be used with all of the 6″ dies that Accuquilt makes. In fact, Accuquilt put together a GO! me EPP Starter Set that includes everything you need!

To cut your pieces, layer your fabric on the die, place a cutting pad on top. This makes your “sandwich.” All you have to do then is run the die through the machine. The machine compresses the sandwich so that the blades in the die are exposed, and cut through the fabric. In the video below, I show you how easy it is to use. I also show you how to cut the English Paper Piecing papers, which you can cut out of cardstock, or using postcard promotional mailers that come in your mailbox.

Now you’ll want to save all of those promotional mailers that come in your inbox so you can use them for English Paper Piecing!

How to Sew English Paper Piecing

Once you’ve cut your pieces, you’ll need to baste your papers to your fabric, and then you sew them together. This video shows you how to baste and sew your English Paper Piecing shapes. I also go over how to baste the different shapes – not just the hexagons.

One of my favorite projects I made for this launch was the Butterfly Tote Bag. The butterfly uses all 4 shapes in the EPP Qube, and the tote is made using the 2 1/2″ strip die. The butterfly tote pattern is free on the Accuquilt website and is also included in the booklet that comes with the EPP Qube. All the fabrics used in this tote are Art Gallery Fabrics Pure Solids.

Another project I created for the launch was this zippered pouch pattern. Great for storing all of your little pieces, these pouches are fun to make. And all the dies used to make them will fit through your 6″ EPP Qube!

One of my favorite things about this set is how easy it is to cut up my scraps to use for English Paper Piecing! I wanted to create a design that was simple to piece into units that I can turn into a scrap quilt. That is how I came up with the Radiant Block. I wrote up a full pattern for this block that you can use to start making a planned scrappy quilt, which is available in my pattern shop. And if you just want to try your hand at EPP without investing in the Accuquilt GO! dies yet, I do include printable paper template pieces in the pattern.

I also stitched up a fun Halloween pillow. This Jack O’ Lantern has a great grin, and is perfect out of scrappy fabrics or your favorite orange print. The Hexie Halloween Pillow pattern was designed to use the Accuquilt GO! Qube, but includes printable templates as well. You can get the Halloween Hexie Pillow Pattern in my pattern shop.

English Paper Piecing Books

To go along with the launch of the new EPP Qube, Accuquilt launched a new EPP book! I share a peek into that book as well as my own English Paper Piecing book, and some of my other favorite books for EPP inspiration in this video.

Here are the affiliate links to the books in the video:
English Paper Piecing Made Easy
Learn How to English Paper Piece
All Points Patchwork Book
The New Hexagon
The New Hexagon 2 Book
The New Hexagon Calendar
Hexa Go Go

You can purchase your Accuquilt GO! EPP Qube on Accuquilt’s website.

Quilt Block Masks

Ever since I learned that it was not only going to be socially acceptable to put fabric on my face, it was actually going to be mandatory, I have been wanting to make some quilt block masks. Because if people can’t see my smiling face, then at least they can see some happy quilt blocks! Which isn’t quite the same, but for now we’ll just pretend that it is fine. Because that’s kind of what 2020 is all about … pretending that things are fine. And also wearing quilt blocks on our faces. I’m going to make that a thing.

Making a quilt block mask is pretty easy if you have some small-ish orphan blocks lying around (which I do). I grabbed a 3″ finished star that I made with the Strippy Stars Tool when I was working on the Patriot Ruler of the Month (I have a video on how the tool works if you click over to the Patriot Ruler of the Month quilt). I made the second mask using a pineapple block I had leftover from the Who Wore it Better Ruler of the Month. You can go check that one out as well for details on how to use the pineapple trim tool.

So, grab your orphan block (or make a block using the instructions linked above) and a Fat Quarter of fabric.

You’ll also need a mask pattern. This technique works with lots of different styles of masks, so if you already have a favorite pattern, you can use that one. If you don’t have a favorite mask pattern (those are words I never thought I’d be typing out and yet here we are…), I used the Craft Passion Mask for mine.

Add fabric to all four sides of the block to make sure it is big enough for the pattern. Add more than you think you’ll need. You won’t regret it.

Line up your pattern over the quilt block. You can make some choices – do you want the block more towards the front or the back? Remember you have a seam allowance on all sides.

Cut out the block according to your pattern.

Cut out the other side of the mask, then the lining pieces, and sew up as indicated on the pattern for the mask style that you chose. No other changes need to be made … and now you get to wear a quilt block on your face!!

As long as we’ll be wearing masks … they might as well be cute, right?

Introducing the Spot on Dot

Several months ago, I had an idea. Why can’t we magnify right on our quilting rulers? I don’t know about you, but my eyesight certainly hasn’t gotten any better the older I’ve gotten, and my eye doctor say I should expect it to continue to get worse.

Since more accurate cuts lead to more precise piecing and perfect points, I wanted to find a way to get the most accurate cuts possible. Which is how the Spot on Dot was born!

Watch the video here to get all the details on how the Spot on Dot makes accurate cutting so much easier!

I’m so excited to be able to share this product with you! It is currently available for order by retailers – so let your local quilt shop know they need to put in their orders for the Spot on Dot! We’re expecting it will be on your store’s shelves by February 1st of 2020.

The Spot on Dot comes with its own case, and the adhesive rings are easy to clean with mild soap and water. A gentle cleaning will remove any lint that has built up on the adhesive, and your Spot on Dot will start sticking like it was new again!

You’re going to wonder how you managed quilting without your Spot on Dot!