English Paper Piecing with Accuquilt

I’m so excited to share with you the newest Accuquilt Qube, which was designed specifically for English Paper Piecing. I got early access to these dies as I worked with Accuquilt to create patterns for the launch, and can’t wait to share all that I have been up to! If you’ve been around a while, you know that I love English Paper Piecing … so this project was an absolute joy for me to work on!

Throughout this post I’ll share links to products and projects. Most of these are affiliate links, so if you make a purchase after clicking one of these links I will get a small commission from the sale.

This EPP Qube is a set of dies designed for English Paper Piecing that are incredibly well thought out. The set includes 8 dies – four for cutting the papers, and four for cutting the the fabric. The four shapes are a triangle, diamond, half-hexagon, and (of course) a hexagon. All the pieces have 1″ finished sides (except for the half-hexagon which has a long side that is 2″), and all the fabric is cut with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Because all of the units have a 1″ finished size, they all fit together perfectly!

I did a full unboxing video to show you all about the Accuquilt GO! EPP Qube:

How the Accuquilt Works

If you’re not familiar with the Accuquilt system, it is designed for quilters to help us with cutting fabric quickly and accurately. Accuquilt has lots of different quilting shapes – from traditional shapes like squares and half square triangles, to applique shapes like hearts and umbrellas, to specialty shapes like the double wedding ring.

To use the dies, you need an Accuquilt GO! cutting machine. There are different sizes of the machine, to accommodate the different sizes of dies. You can use the smaller dies in the larger machines, but you can’t fit the larger dies in the smaller machines. The EPP Qubes are just 6 inches, so you can use any of the Accuquilt GO! machines with the EPP dies.

I have the Accuquilt GO! fabric cutter, but the Accuquilt GO! me is great for a beginner, and can be used with all of the 6″ dies that Accuquilt makes. In fact, Accuquilt put together a GO! me EPP Starter Set that includes everything you need!

To cut your pieces, layer your fabric on the die, place a cutting pad on top. This makes your “sandwich.” All you have to do then is run the die through the machine. The machine compresses the sandwich so that the blades in the die are exposed, and cut through the fabric. In the video below, I show you how easy it is to use. I also show you how to cut the English Paper Piecing papers, which you can cut out of cardstock, or using postcard promotional mailers that come in your mailbox.

Now you’ll want to save all of those promotional mailers that come in your inbox so you can use them for English Paper Piecing!

How to Sew English Paper Piecing

Once you’ve cut your pieces, you’ll need to baste your papers to your fabric, and then you sew them together. This video shows you how to baste and sew your English Paper Piecing shapes. I also go over how to baste the different shapes – not just the hexagons.

One of my favorite projects I made for this launch was the Butterfly Tote Bag. The butterfly uses all 4 shapes in the EPP Qube, and the tote is made using the 2 1/2″ strip die. The butterfly tote pattern is free on the Accuquilt website and is also included in the booklet that comes with the EPP Qube. All the fabrics used in this tote are Art Gallery Fabrics Pure Solids.

Another project I created for the launch was this zippered pouch pattern. Great for storing all of your little pieces, these pouches are fun to make. And all the dies used to make them will fit through your 6″ EPP Qube!

One of my favorite things about this set is how easy it is to cut up my scraps to use for English Paper Piecing! I wanted to create a design that was simple to piece into units that I can turn into a scrap quilt. That is how I came up with the Radiant Block. I wrote up a full pattern for this block that you can use to start making a planned scrappy quilt, which is available in my pattern shop. And if you just want to try your hand at EPP without investing in the Accuquilt GO! dies yet, I do include printable paper template pieces in the pattern.

I also stitched up a fun Halloween pillow. This Jack O’ Lantern has a great grin, and is perfect out of scrappy fabrics or your favorite orange print. The Hexie Halloween Pillow pattern was designed to use the Accuquilt GO! Qube, but includes printable templates as well. You can get the Halloween Hexie Pillow Pattern in my pattern shop.

English Paper Piecing Books

To go along with the launch of the new EPP Qube, Accuquilt launched a new EPP book! I share a peek into that book as well as my own English Paper Piecing book, and some of my other favorite books for EPP inspiration in this video.

Here are the affiliate links to the books in the video:
English Paper Piecing Made Easy
Learn How to English Paper Piece
All Points Patchwork Book
The New Hexagon
The New Hexagon 2 Book
The New Hexagon Calendar
Hexa Go Go

You can purchase your Accuquilt GO! EPP Qube on Accuquilt’s website.

Find Balance Quilt

I’m so excited to share with you my newest quilt – the Find Balance Quilt!

This quilt is super fun and modern. I can’t wait to free motion quilt all the fabulous negative space in the Finding Balance Quilt. It is made using traditional piecing, fussy-cutting of the bottom units, and the Creative Grids Square on Square 6″ Trim Tool for making the Square in a Square blocks. If you’ve never used this ruler, I have a video that shows you exactly how it works!

I encourage you to purchase your ruler and other quilting supplies at your local quilt shop. However, if you need to purchase online, here are affiliate links which give me a small commission when you make purchases by clicking these affiliate links. You can purchase the Square on Square 6″ Trim Tool at Fat Quarter shop or you can buy your Square on Square 6″ Trim Tool on Amazon.

I also show my Spot on Dot in the video. Fat Quarter Shop Sells the Spot on Dot here.

The pattern is free, but only until the next pattern goes up! Sign up for my newsletter below to get a link to the pattern download.

 

Yay Rulers!

Sign up below to get the free Ruler of the Month pattern, the Find Balance Quilt! You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Your pattern is in your inbox! If you have any problems contact me at carolina@carolinamoore.com

If you have any issues with getting the free pattern, check your spam folder first. If you can’t find it there, email me at carolina@carolinamoore.com and I’ll get it sent to you!

Cards from Fabric Scraps

Squaring up blocks is a necessary evil, when it comes to quilting. It is absolutely necessary to get points to line up and quilt tops to lie flat. But it is tedious and boring. And I’ll never love it. Though it is satisfying to see a pile of trimmings get larger on the side of my cutting mat.

Recently, I had a very pretty set of trimmings, and decided I needed to make something out of them. That same week, I dug through my stash of cards to discover I didn’t have any nice cards to send out. I thought I’d kill two birds with one stone and make some pretty cards with my scraps!

Making these cards is super simple. You need blank cards, your scraps, a glue stick (regular school glue stick is fine but you can use a fancy sewing glue stick), and your sewing machine.

Swipe a line of glue across the front of the card. Then start placing your tiny strips. Don’t worry about the length, that will all get trimmed down later.

Place strips all the way across.

Before you stitch across, make your stitch length longer. We just need to tack the strips down, we don’t need to perforate the paper.

Stitch all the way across. You can have straight lines, angled lines, curved lines, whatever you like. This is a great opportunity to use up old bobbin thread and spools that are almost empty.

Stitch multiple times for more interest and texture. I went with five times.

Trim off the ends. Different lengths adds more interest.

That’s it! Make a whole stack so that you have fun cards handy when you want to send a little note to someone.

Oh, and you can see that I made a second type as well. Same basic process, just overlapping some extra fabric squares and stitching over them. You can do all different kinds of fun designs, depending on what your scraps look like.

Make sure to pin this project to make later!

Cards from fabric scraps

Introducing the Spot on Dot

Several months ago, I had an idea. Why can’t we magnify right on our quilting rulers? I don’t know about you, but my eyesight certainly hasn’t gotten any better the older I’ve gotten, and my eye doctor say I should expect it to continue to get worse.

Since more accurate cuts lead to more precise piecing and perfect points, I wanted to find a way to get the most accurate cuts possible. Which is how the Spot on Dot was born!

Watch the video here to get all the details on how the Spot on Dot makes accurate cutting so much easier!

I’m so excited to be able to share this product with you! It is currently available for order by retailers – so let your local quilt shop know they need to put in their orders for the Spot on Dot! We’re expecting it will be on your store’s shelves by February 1st of 2020.

The Spot on Dot comes with its own case, and the adhesive rings are easy to clean with mild soap and water. A gentle cleaning will remove any lint that has built up on the adhesive, and your Spot on Dot will start sticking like it was new again!

You’re going to wonder how you managed quilting without your Spot on Dot!

Custom Fabric Letterboard

Have you ever wanted a letterboard that fit your decor perfectly? One that wasn’t just made from plain felt? Do you have a favorite fabric that would make a perfect letterboard but no idea how to make it happen? Well, here you go! Step-by-step on how to make your a custom fabric letterboard out of your favorite fabric!

I do want to mention that it is the texture of the felt that helps keeps plastic letters in place. Using a quilting cotton like I have here makes them more likely to slip out if the board is hanging up. But it is still perfect for flat-lay photos.

To make your custom fabric letterboard, you’ll need:

1/2 yard of main fabric
1/2 yard of fusible fleece
1/4 yard of border fabric
Cheap or old letterboard
Hot glue and hot glue gun
Rotary cutter and ruler
Marking tool
Plastic cards such as gift cards or hotel key cards

Start by taking apart the old/cheap felt board. Usually they are just glued together, so it is pretty simple to do.

Once you have removed the frame and felt, you’ll have a wooden board with grooves on it. If you have access to a woodshop (or access to someone who has access to a woodshop) they could probably make one of these base boards for you. But, for most of us, just buying a cheap letterboard and taking it apart is easier.

Cut your chosen fabric 1-2″ wider than your board. You want to give yourself a little room. Keep the length of the fabric, don’t trim this down. You can trim it down at the end.

Then back the fabric with fusible fleece.

Then, start tucking the fabric into the grooves. I found this was easiest to do with a plastic card – you could use a gift card or a hotel key card or a store loyalty card. Just something sturdy that will help press the fabric down into the crease.

Keep going, inserting the fabric into each crease. I found that holding the previous crease in place with one card while pushing in the next crease was most successful.

Keep going, inserting the fabric into all the creases.

You may find, if you always start from one side, that the fabric starts to “creep” in that direction. To prevent the creeping, alternate the directions in which you make the creases. Crease one from right to left, and the next from left to right.

When you’re done, trim off the excess around all four sides.

Glue down the edges with hot glue.

Use a fabric marking tool to mark a border around the letterboard. I went with a 1/2″ border, but you can choose what feels right for you.

Measure from this border line all the way to the back, with a 1/2″ overlap. Then double your measurement. This is the width you need to cut for your border strips. Cut a strip this width. Fold the strip in half so that it is just as long, but half as wide (as you would for quilt binding).

Cut a length of this strip as long as the side. Glue this strip to one side of the felt board, with the fabric fold right on the line you drew marking the edge of the border.

Wait for the glue to set, then wrap the strip around to the back. Glue in place. You’ll need to glue down both layers. You can trim the corners on the back to reduce the bulk.

Repeat for the other side. Then repeat for the top and bottom. If you like, you can fold the edges of the top and bottom in to create more finished corners.

That’s it! Your custom fabric letterboard is complete!

Make a custom fabric letterboard in whichever fabrics suit your mood! Once you know how to make it for yourself, it will be hard to make just one!

No Sew Mini Quilt with Cricut Patterned Iron-On

If you’ve been following along with the Cricut Maker Block of the Week, you know that you need a Cricut Maker to cut the fabric for the quilt. One of the top questions that I get about the quilt is – can it be made using the Cricut Explore series of machines? Unfortunately… no. Only the Cricut Maker cuts non-bonded fabric. All of that changed when Cricut offered to send me some of their new Patterned Iron-On! I couldn’t wait to use it to show you how you can make a “cheater” version of this quilt. Even better… it is a no-sew project to put together the quilt top!

I’ve put together a step-by-step video to show you how easy it is to “quilt” without sewing a single stitch! Check out the video below!

No Sew Mini Quilt

This post contains affiliate links which help support this site at no extra cost to you.

12″x24″ Cricut Cutting Mat (blue or green)
EasyPress
Cricut EasyPress Mat
Device with Design Space
Water Soluble Pen
Scissors
Weeding Tool
Fabric (cut at least 20″x20″)
Cricut Patterned Iron-On
2 Rolls of colored Iron-On (12″x19″)  or 1 roll of SportFlex (11.8″x24″)
Your Cricut Machine (Maker or Explore series)

supplies for No Sew Mini Quilt using Cricut Patterned Iron-On

You’ll need the Cricut Design Space file I created with all 9 quilt blocks. Cut every color with a different pattern or color of Iron-On, except the purple. You don’t need to cut the purple at all, as you see in the video.

 The Patterned Iron-On is so fun to use – it is like fusing on fabric designs! There are 9 different sampler packs, each with 3 different designs – that’s over 25 patterns to choose from! You can use a single pack, mix and match packs, or mix in solid colors like I did here!

Remember, when you cut any Iron-On material, always cut it with the “pretty” side facing down, and click the toggle in Design Space that tells your Cricut Machine to reverse the design.

cut your patterned iron-on

As you weed the layers, match them up. This will help you keep track of the pieces, and make sure that you get each weeded properly.

layer the blocks as you weed

Make sure to peel off the transfer sheet before adding the next layer. Don’t remove a transfer sheet until you need to – you want to keep them on to protect the Iron-On while you’re still using heat! Without the transfer sheet, the Iron-on can melt under the heat of the EasyPress.

add layers removing transfer sheet

When you’re all done, you’ll be amazed at how much it looks like a real quilt – yet you didn’t sew a single stitch!

finished quilt top

You can use your faux quilt to make a pillow cover, you can quilt it to make a quilt, you can use it as the side of a large tote bag… there are so many ways you can use this faux quilting technique!

 

If you want to make the shirt I wear in this video, go check out the details for the Shoo Fly Quilt Block Tee!

Simple DIY Quilt Block Tee

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Cricut Maker Block of the Week Quilt: Week 11 – Adding Borders

Welcome to week 11 of the Cricut Maker Block of the Week! This week we’re going to finish the quilt top by adding the borders that we cut in Week 1: Intro. Adding the borders means that the quilt top is complete, but our quilt isn’t finished yet. Next week I’ll show you how to quilt your quilt top, and the next week I’ll show you the final step: Binding. I promised you 14 weeks of making this quilt. In week 1 I shared both the into and the first block because I knew you wouldn’t want to wait to start sewing. So in the final week, I’ll share a fun bonus project with you!

If you have just found this series, start by going to the Cricut Maker Block of the Week Reference Page. That has all the links and videos to get you started from the very beginning.

Adding Borders

You can follow the written steps below, or you can watch this video as I show you how to put on the borders:

Start by laying out the borders. There are two long strips and two short strips.

lay out borders

Stitch the short borders to the top and bottom of the quilt top. In the video I show you how to pin the strip to the quilt top to keep them even. Here are the basic steps:

Place the border piece on top of the quilt. Line up the top edge and corners. Pin at the corners.

Find the middle of the border and quilt edge. Add a crease if needed. Pin to secure the centers together.

Add more pins as needed on each side. Often, either the quilt is slightly bigger than the border, or the border is slightly bigger than the quilt. Pinning allows you to ease the extra fabric into the seam without ripples or puckers.

Press. The seam allowance should go towards the border.

press borders

Now it is time to add the other borders.

add side borders

Follow the same steps to pin the borders to the quilt. Press again, and your quilt is complete!

finished quilt top

Come back next week as I show you how to quilt the quilt top!

 

Cricut Maker Block of the Week Quilt: Week 10 – Adding Sashing

We’re up to week TEN of our Cricut Maker Block of the Week! I’m so excited!! This week we get to put all those quilt blocks together into a quilt top, using the sashing that we cut in Week 1: Intro. So, we will have no actual cutting today! Just sewing and pressing as we add the sashing pieces and make our mini quilt top for our Cricut Maker Block of the Week quilt!

If you’re just finding this series, start by going to the Cricut Maker Block of the Week Reference Page. That has all the links and videos to get you started from the very beginning.

Cricut Maker Block of the Week - Week 10 - Adding Sashing to your quilt

 

Let’s get started on adding the sashing! No cut file this week, since we cut the sashing at the very beginning. The reason we cut the sashing first, even though we didn’t need it until now, was because there are such large sashing pieces. We want to cut these larger pieces first, and then our smaller pieces after. If we cut the smaller pieces first, there might not be enough room on our fabric to cut the larger pieces later.

If you’d like to watch the video, you can watch it here. Or you can follow along in the step-by-step photos below.

Note: In the video, I show you how to square up blocks. Ideally, your quilt blocks are all exactly the right size. When I stitched the version seen in the photos below, they were very accurate. The blocks I stitched for the video were less accurate (not surprising since I had my head off to an angle to keep it out of the camera frame, and my mind was focused on talking and filming instead of just sewing).

Grab thoe sashing pieces that we set aside. Leave the border pieces. We’ll be using the border pieces next week.

Lay out all nine blocks, and the sashing pieces. You don’t have to use the same layout I did. Depending on the fabrics you chose, your quilt might look better with a different layout. And even if you chose the exact same fabrics, you might like a different layout than mine. There are no wrong choices here.

lay out quilt top

If you’ve been following along, you know that each step builds on the previous steps. This step builds on past steps. Because this part of the quilt looks remarkably like something else we have done before…

lay out the block

That’s right! The nine patch! Putting together this quilt top is just like a nine patch… but with adding the sashing pieces between the blocks. Which is easy.

Start by stitching your sashing and blocks into rows. Press the seams towards the sashing strips.

press rows

Lay the quilt back out.

finished rows

Now stitch the sashing to the top and middle rows. It helps to pin the sashing on each end, and then in the middle. This ensures that the sashing is even along the length of the whole row. Press the seam allowance towards the sashing.

sashing on rows

I don’t have photos of this step, but you can watch in the video. What we want to do here is line up each vertical sashing strip with the sashing strip above/below it. That would be easy to do with seam allowances. But the horizontal sashing doesn’t have seam allowances. Use a ruler (or any straight edge – the edge of your mat will do) and your blue water-soluble marking pen from the Cricut machine to extend the seam allowance lines down across the back of your sashing pieces. Then match up the rows, pinning where the seam allowance from the bottom row matches up with the line that you’ve drawn. Then stitch the rows together.

finished sashings

Press all the seam allowances towards the sashing, and you’re all done!

Next week we’ll add the borders. And the week after we’ll get to my favorite part… quilting!

 

Cricut Maker Block of the Week Quilt: Block 9 – Mother’s Dream

The final block in our Cricut Maker Block of the week! Today we’re making Block 9, the Mother’s Dream. But don’t worry, we won’t be stopping here! Next week I’ll show you how to put the blocks together with the sashing we cut in Week 1: Intro, then we’ll add borders, quilt our mini quilt, and I’ll show you how to bind and finish the quilt!

If you’re just getting started, head over to the Cricut Maker Block of the Week Reference Page. There you’ll be able to start from the very beginning, with all the videos and links to get you started in making the quilt!

Cricut Maker Block of the Week - Week 9 - Mother's Dream

This post contains affiliate links which help support this site at no additional cost to you.

 

If you’d like to watch this week’s video, I’ll show you step-by-step how to put the block together. I’ll also show you a slightly different way to piece this block in the step-by-step photos and instructions that you can find by scrolling down a little further.

 

Start by cutting out all the pieces. Here is the Mother’s Dream Quilt Block Design Space File. Lay out all the pieces like this:

Look at rows

Yes, we’re laying out the pieces in diagonal rows. But before we can put the rows together, we have to stitch the two rectangles together to make squares. Sew each set together, and press towards the dark.

lay out block

Now we can start stitching our rows. Sew the three pieces in row 2 together. And the three pieces in row 4. In row 3, go ahead and just stitch together the three center pieces.

For rows 2 and 4, press the seams out. For row 3, press the seams in. This will allow everything to nest beautifully when you stitch the rows together.

press

Stitch row 1 to row 2, and row 4 to row 5.

stitch side

Then stitch these sides to the middle. Press.

All that is left is to stitch on the other corners.

stitch on corners

Go ahead and clip off the dog-ears now. Your quilt block is finished! Next week we’ll combine it with the other 8!

finished mother's dream quilt block

 

Cricut Maker Block of the Week Quilt: Block 8 – Whirligig

It is time for Block 8 of our Cricut Maker Block of the Week! Just one more block, and then we will start to put the whole quilt together! WHEE! I can’t wait! I will be showing you every step of the quilting process, all the way through binding the quilt. When we finish, you will have a completed quilt that you made yourself! This week, for Blcok 8, we are making the Whirligig block! This block is different than other blocks we have done in the past, because the units that make up the block are not square. We are making triangular units, then stitching those together.

If you’re just joining in, check out the Cricut Maker Block of the Week Reference Page. It has everything you need to make this quilt from the very beginning, so you can get all caught up!

Cricut Maker Block of the Week Quilt Week 8 - Whirligig

This post contains affiliate links which help support this site at no extra cost to you.

 

You can watch the video as I take you through the steps of making this fun block, or you can read below for written instructions and step-by-step photos.


Start by opening the Whirligig Block file in Cricut Design Space. Cut out the pieces and lay them out so you can visualize the block.

lay out pieces

Place the triangle right-sides-together with the larger piece.

make quarters

 

Stitch the triangles onto the larger pieces to make larger triangles.

stitch pieces

Press.

press

Lay the pieces back out. Stitch pairs together to make two halves. Press.

line up quarters

two halves

Stitch the two halves together to make a whole. Press.

finished whirligig

One more block to go!!