California Poppy Quilt Block

Hey quilting friends! I’m so excited about the California Poppy Quilt Block that I’ll be sharing with you today! This is part of a project I’m doing with a whole bunch of other Quilt Pattern Designers. Every week someone is sharing another block representing another state in the US, and all the blocks are free! If you follow along, you’ll be able to make a whole quilt representing all 50 states! Super fun, right?

I moved to California at age 4, and lived in the desert for most of my school-aged years. I’ve since moved around to different parts of California – and boy are they different! California has just about every kind of terrain you could want! Of course people know all about California beaches. We also have fabulous mountains for hiking and winter sports, rocky hillsides perfect for growing grapes (and making wine), beautiful agricultural lands, and the lovely desert where I grew up.

So, when I was tasked with coming up with a single 6″ quilt block that would represent the whole state, I was stumped! What is one symbol that can represent the whole state? And then I remembered our state flower – the California Poppy. When I was a child going on road trips with my family, there would be fields full of these beautiful flowers. People would plan trips to come out and see the poppies. It is very much part of California – and very much part of my childhood growing up here.

The California Poppy Quilt Block is a 6″ block, and is traditionally pieced. I used fabulous Art Gallery Solids to piece my version. You can get your free pattern below, and also get added to our mailing list of fabulous quilters.

 

Free Quilt Block!

Sign up below to get the free California Poppy Quilt Block. If you’re not already on my list of awesome quilters, I’ll get you added. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Woo Hoo!! Check your email for the download link. If you’re having problems, contact me at carolina@carolinamoore.com

The poppy isn’t just the state flower for California. It has become a symbol of memorial. Originally, it was used to commemorate those who lost their lives in World War One, but has come to memorialize those lost in all conflicts since. It is specifically connected to the Royal British Legion, who say that the Red Poppy is a symbol of remembrance and hope.

Poppies in different colors have different meanings as well, Purple is to remember animal victims of war (in earlier wars, horses and dogs were common parts of the war effort), the Black Poppy is for Africa, Black, and Carribians lost in wars, and the white poppy is both a symbol of remembrance and a symbol of peace.

To honor all of these uses of the poppy as a symbol, I created the Memorial Poppy pattern. You can make your poppy in whatever colors you like, and surround them with a heart.

You can also use this pattern to take any of the 6″ state blocks from this series, and add a heart around it. When finished, the block measures 12″ x 12″. You can purchase the Memorial Poppy Pattern in my shop here.

One of the questions I get asked often is how to piece with such small pieces of fabric! This block finishes at 6″, and that means that some of these pieces are pretty small! My biggest tip when working with small pieces (and bias pieces, though this pattern doesn’t have any pieces sewn on the bias) is to starch my fabrics well. I made a video on starching fabrics that will show you my starching techniques.

If you’re just joining in the Around the Block – US tour, you can find all the details over at the Around the Block Headquarters.

If you’d like to find last week’s pattern you can go to Kissed Quilts, the week before can be found at Appliques Quilts and More. If you want to know where you’ll find next week’s pattern, it will be at Off the Wall Quilts, and the following week will be at Sarah Ruiz Quilts.

Cards from Fabric Scraps

Squaring up blocks is a necessary evil, when it comes to quilting. It is absolutely necessary to get points to line up and quilt tops to lie flat. But it is tedious and boring. And I’ll never love it. Though it is satisfying to see a pile of trimmings get larger on the side of my cutting mat.

Recently, I had a very pretty set of trimmings, and decided I needed to make something out of them. That same week, I dug through my stash of cards to discover I didn’t have any nice cards to send out. I thought I’d kill two birds with one stone and make some pretty cards with my scraps!

Making these cards is super simple. You need blank cards, your scraps, a glue stick (regular school glue stick is fine but you can use a fancy sewing glue stick), and your sewing machine.

Swipe a line of glue across the front of the card. Then start placing your tiny strips. Don’t worry about the length, that will all get trimmed down later.

Place strips all the way across.

Before you stitch across, make your stitch length longer. We just need to tack the strips down, we don’t need to perforate the paper.

Stitch all the way across. You can have straight lines, angled lines, curved lines, whatever you like. This is a great opportunity to use up old bobbin thread and spools that are almost empty.

Stitch multiple times for more interest and texture. I went with five times.

Trim off the ends. Different lengths adds more interest.

That’s it! Make a whole stack so that you have fun cards handy when you want to send a little note to someone.

Oh, and you can see that I made a second type as well. Same basic process, just overlapping some extra fabric squares and stitching over them. You can do all different kinds of fun designs, depending on what your scraps look like.

Make sure to pin this project to make later!

Cards from fabric scraps

Summer Sew Camp!

I am so excited to announce a project I’ve been working on for weeks and weeks… Summer Sew Camp! This is a week-long set of projects designed specifically for teaching kids how to sew.

Summer Sew Camp

First of all – YES! Adults can play along as well (of course!) But I have designed this with kids in mind. Before we get down to things, let me answer a couple of questions I know you’re going to ask:

How much does Summer Sew Camp cost?

It is free. The instruction pages are free. The videos are free. And they will stay free. It is my pleasure to pass on my love of sewing to the next generation.

How old do kids need to be to participate?

That is up to you. With 100% support from an adult, I think a child as young as 6 would have fun “helping” to make these projects. And older kids will be able to make them with little or no help. If children can operate a sewing machine, wield a hot iron, and are comfortable with scissors and pins, then they can make all of these projects.

What about rotary cutters?

No rotary cutters. I made all of these project instructions and videos without using a rotary cutter. Yes, really.

When does it start?

It is all live right now. You can scroll down to watch all the videos in the playlist. Or, if you prefer, you can subscribe below to get daily emails for a week with all the links you need!

I’m sure you have more questions … I answer lots of them in this video:

If you’d like to get started, you can download the introduction and get a detailed supply list by clicking hereyou’ll also find the full instruction packet here.

I also made a quick video just for kids … so if you’d like to show your child this video (it is less than 3 minutes long) to find out if Summer Sew Camp sounds like fun to them, check it out here:

You absolutely don’t have to subscribe to access Summer Sew Camp. You can head to the link above to download the files, and head to my YouTube Channel to watch all the videos.

However, if you’re like me, your email inbox helps you organize your life. If you sign up below, I’ll send you an email with links to the supply list and intro details, and starting on Monday, you’ll get an email each day with the two lessons for that day. When the week is up, you won’t get any more emails from me unless you subscribe to my main mailing list.

 

Summer Sew Camp!

Sign up below to get notified about all things Summer Sew Camp. You will NOT be added to our main email list.

Welcome!

I always recommend buying supplies at a local quilt shop, whenever possible. Local quilt shops have experts right behind the counter who can help you with just about any project. Every place we have lived, finding my LQS (Local Quilt Shop) has been as essential as finding the grocery store and a new dentist! However, if you need a quick link to a couple of the supplies I mention in the video, you can use these affiliate links:

Pins at the Fat Quarter Shop
Fabric Scissors at The Fat Quarter Shop or Fabric Scissors on Amazon
Fabric Marking Pen at The Fat Quarter Shop or Fabric Marking Pen on Amazon
Rectangle Quilting Ruler at The Fat Quarter Shop or Rectangle Quilting Ruler on Amazon
Square Quilting Ruler at The Fat Quarter Shop or Square Quilting Ruler on Amazon
Sticky Back Velcro for Fabrics on Amazon
Sew-in Magnetic Snap on Amazon
Heavy Weight Interfacing on Amazon
Fusible Fleece at The Fat Quarter Shop or Fusible Fleece on Amazon
Polyfil Stuffing on Amazon

If you’d like to watch the whole series, it is all in this playlist. There are 13 videos and it is over 250 minutes that teaches over a dozen projects. I don’t recommend you binge it all in one day!

Or you can head to my YouTube Channel and Subscribe there.

Quilt Block Mania – Summer Tent Quilt Block

I’m so excited to share Summer Tent Quilt Block with you! A couple weeks ago, I got together with some quilting friends and decided we’d put together some FREE Summer-themed quilt blocks to share with all of you! All of these blocks finish at 12″ x 12″. You can download them all, or just your favorites. If you scroll all the way down you’ll find links to all the fabulous quilt blocks in this series!

This Moonlit Tent block was inspired by one of my favorite summer activities – camping! We had to put our camping plans on hold this summer, but we’re hoping to get back to putting up tents, making s’mores, and sleeping out under the trees very soon! In the meantime, this camping-themed quilt block will have to do, I suppose?

You can combine this quilt block with others in the series to make your own summer-themed quilt. Or, you can use a single quilt block to make a mini quilt, a tote bag, or a pillow!

To make this camping inspired tent block, you’ll be making half-rectangle-triangles. You’ve probably made half-square-triangles before. Half-rectangle-triangles are a whole different thing. For many reasons. One, is that when you make them you have to be very careful about making your right-facing triangles and your left-facing triangles. You can’t just turn your unit 90 degrees like you can with a HST. Another is that if you want perfect points (and we all want to at least try for perfect points, right?), you have to be very careful when squaring up your blocks. You need to be aware of the seam allowance as you square, because the seam isn’t at that perfect 45 degree angle like it is with an HST. I have some tips in the pattern that will help you as you make your block.

I’ve also put together a video that shows you how to find success with these tricky HRT blocks! You can watch it here… and if you’re not already a subscriber to my YouTube channel, click over to YouTube to subscribe! I have lots of fun stuff coming up you won’t want to miss!

Sign up for my newsletter to get your free Moonlit Tent Quilt Block!

 

Free Quilt Block!

Sign up below to get the free Moonlit Tent Quilt Block! You’ll also be added to my weekly e-mail list of awesomeness. You can unsubscribe anytime.

Yay! The link to your download is on its way to your inbox!

And check out all the other fabulous blocks in the series!

Here are links to all the blocks in the Quilt Block Mania Summer Series:
Camping Tent by Carolina Moore
Beach Umbrella by Jennifer Fulton
Flip Flops by Becca Fenstermaker
Summer Cocktail by Marian Pena
Beach Ball by Laura Piland
Popsicle by Sherry Shish
Curvy fish by Velda Roy
Angelfish by Lisa Amundson
Bucket and Shovel by Heidi Pridemore
Wonky Beach Umbrella by Jamie Siel
Starfish by Leanne Parsons
Sailboat at Sunset by Glenda Wilder
Yacht by Sue Griffiths
Food/Ice Cream Truck by Laura Strickland
Crab by Afton Warrick
Sleeping bag and star by Sarah Vanderburgh
Funky Flower by Kathryn LeBlanc
IceCream Cond by Sarah Marcina
Sunglasses by Celine Perkins
Sun by Charisma Horton
Hello Summer by Amarar Creacions
Tall Ships by Kris Driessen
Life Saver Preserver by Sandy Fitzpatrick
Dragon Fly by Julie Luoma
Up in The Air by Judit Hajdu
Surfboard by Susan Arnold
Beach Treasures by Linda Bratten
Two Scoops by Shari Butler
Free to Fly by Marcea Owen


Nesting Basket Pattern Launch

Launching a new pattern is one of my favorite things. While it has been tough to manage all the deadlines during this global upheaval, making progress, if even on the little things, feels like a big thing.

The Nesting Basket pattern has been in the works since 2016. I’ve made them for friends, for fabric launches, and for my own use. And each time I’ve been asked for the pattern, but told the person it just wasn’t ready yet. Well, today is the day! The pattern is ready. It is incredibly simple, fun to make, and you probably have everything you need on hand to make your own nesting baskets.

If you want to make all three with contrasting colors, you need 6 fat quarters. You can see on the pattern cover that I used the middle basket uses the same fabric as the lining of the large basket and the outer of the smallest basket. You can get away with just 5 fat quarters to do this – you need just one fat quarter of the middle inner/small outer fabric. And you’ll want to plan your cutting before you make any cuts.

The fabrics I used for the cover baskets are all Art Gallery Fabrics (of course!). I used florals from Amy Sinibaldi’s Mayfair line, and the lining for the smallest basket is fabric from AGF Foresta Fusion.

You’ll also need 1 1/4 yards of medium-weight interfacing. I used HeatnBond Heavy Weight Fusible iron on interfacing. One 20″ x 1 yard package was enough. You can also use fusible fleece, or a foam-based stabilizer made for bags and purses. Use what you have, the pattern is versatile! And there are alternate handle instructions if you’re using a heavier stabilizer.

You can whip up a full set of nesting baskets in an afternoon. And nothing about the pattern makes you make all three sizes if you don’t need all three. You can make stacks of large baskets if that is what you need, or an army of small baskets if it keeps you organized. I like a large and a medium for small pieces I’m working on at the sewing machine.

The nesting baskets are great for scraps, selvedges, tools, or whatever you like. The largest basket finishes at 6 1/2″ square, and the smallest is 4″ square.

The nesting basket pattern is available for sale in my pattern shop. Head over to purchase your pattern. When you make yours, share it on Instagram and tag me @craftmoore and use the #nestingbasketspattern hashtag.

I can’t wait to see all of your fabulous nesting baskets!

A Baby Lock Partnership

Hey Quilting Friends!

I’m over-the-moon excited to share with you that I am now an Influencer with Baby Lock! This is such an incredibly amazing opportunity, and I’m thrilled! They have so many incredibly talented influencers on their team, it is an absolute dream to be in their company. Today is another day where I’m absolutely pinching myself in disbelief that this is what I get to do. If I could, I’d go back in time to third-grade me, and sixth grade me, and ninth grade me, and so many of the other past versions of myself who stressed about what she was going to be when she grew up, and whisper in her ear. While she is wondering, “Should I be a teacher? Do I have the talent to be an Artist? What will it be like as a woman in business?” I would tell her not to worry. She has a place in the world, and it just hasn’t been invented yet.

As part of my work with Baby Lock, I’ll be sewing on two of their machines. The Baby Lock Jubilant, which you’ve already seen me sewing on. It is a fabulous machine that I can quickly pack up to take with me to a sew in, and is great to stitch on at home. The second machine is the Baby Lock Aria. I can’t even tell you all the fabulous things this new machine can do, because I’ve barely finished taking it out of the box! Here is the video I took of the unboxing process. If you watch through to the end you’ll see the magic of the needle threader on this machine!

Also, I find the best way to learn a new machine is to just jump in and start. So, after I set up my new Baby Lock Aria, I stitched up a mini quilt, basted it, and did some free motion quilting. It has been months and months since I did any free motion quilting, and it felt so good to move fabric under the needle again. I need to do it more often. Lots more often.

My mini quilt isn’t quite done yet – I need to finish the quilting in the blue corners and edges. But I had lots of fun putting this together.

And here is the back. For reference, that center part is 11 1/2″ square. So yes – those are some tiny stitches! And the Aria was such a dream to stitch with. The stitches are tiny and perfect and I just love it.

Let me know if there is anything about these machines that you’d like me to share with you! I can’t wait to learn more about my new Aria and explore all the amazing features it has!

Pincushion Necklace

I always need a place to rest my needle between stitches. I can’t tell you how often my sleeve, or pants leg, or the arm of the sofa have become my pincushion in a pinch! This Pincushion necklace is both much more convenient and much more fashionable when it comes to putting your needle somewhere! You can make this pincushion necklace with just a few supplies – most you probably already have at home! And even better – this pincushion is a no-sew project!

This post contains affiliate links which provide a commission to this site when a purchase is made.

To make your pincushion necklace, you’ll need:
Fabric of your choice (I went with this beautiful Bari J. Floral from Art Gallery Fabrics)
Batting Scraps
Pen or other marking tool
Hot Glue and Hot Glue Gun
Mini Wooden Hoop (or find similar here)

Take the hoop center from the hoop. Place it on the fabric. I found a pretty flower to center on my hoop. You’ll want to cut an inch away from the line to give yourself plenty of extra fabric! If you look closely you can see that I traced my line an inch away from the edge of the wooden circle so that I wouldn’t leave lines on my fabric that might be visible in the finished pincushion necklace.

Trace the hoop center onto your batting. You’ll want between 3-5 layers of batting, depending on how thick your batting is. Cut out the batting on the line.

Place your fabric right-side-down on your table. Place the batting pieces on top, and then the wooden hoop center on top of that.

Lift the stack up, and place on top of the hoop front. Make sure the screw on the top of the hoop front has been loosened. Here I have it as loose as possible.

Gently push through until the hoop front is flush with the hoop center. Tighten the screw on the top to secure the hoop in place.

Carefully hot glue the fabric to the hoop center. You’ll want the fabric tight, but not stretched.

You’ll want this fabric as flat as possible.

Once the fabric is on, add some extra hot glue to the back and secure the back on. You can press it down on the table to make everything is as flat as possible.

Your pincushion necklace is complete! This necklace also makes a great gift for friends!

Introducing the Spot on Dot

Several months ago, I had an idea. Why can’t we magnify right on our quilting rulers? I don’t know about you, but my eyesight certainly hasn’t gotten any better the older I’ve gotten, and my eye doctor say I should expect it to continue to get worse.

Since more accurate cuts lead to more precise piecing and perfect points, I wanted to find a way to get the most accurate cuts possible. Which is how the Spot on Dot was born!

Watch the video here to get all the details on how the Spot on Dot makes accurate cutting so much easier!

I’m so excited to be able to share this product with you! It is currently available for order by retailers – so let your local quilt shop know they need to put in their orders for the Spot on Dot! We’re expecting it will be on your store’s shelves by February 1st of 2020.

The Spot on Dot comes with its own case, and the adhesive rings are easy to clean with mild soap and water. A gentle cleaning will remove any lint that has built up on the adhesive, and your Spot on Dot will start sticking like it was new again!

You’re going to wonder how you managed quilting without your Spot on Dot!

Free Starry Lullaby Pattern

I love creating quilts for Art Gallery Fabrics’ look books! And today I’m sharing my latest design as a FREE pattern for you to download! This Starry Lullaby Quilt is made using AGF Pine Lullaby prints. It is quick and simple to make – perfect for an easy baby gift!

This pattern uses large blocks as well as panel pieces, which make it very quick to stitch up! I loved how easily the quilt came together. And those panel prints are so adorable!

You could make all the star blocks the same color, but I love how changing the colors of the blocks adds interest and movement. Really the perfect quilt for laying down on the floor for the baby to lay down on!

It is also the perfect quilt for simple and easy quilting. I just did some straight-ish lines with my walking foot on this quilt. Casual, easy, simple, fast … my favorite things!

 

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Dew and Moss Sewing Party

Today I’m joining in on the Dew and Moss sewing party over on Instagram. I know not everyone is on Instagram, so I thought I’d share some of the fun here.

Dew and Moss is the debut line of the very talented Alexandra Bordallo for Art Galery Fabrics. It features adorable illustrations of houses, flowers, bugs, lanterns, garden people and more all in fabulous earthy colors. I chose to make a quilt (as us quilters are wont to do), and I absolutely love how it turned out!

Now, normally, when I feature a quilt here I have it completely quilted and bound. And that was absolutely my intention with this quilt. But, time got away from me. And I’m planning on hand quilting this quilt. So it just wasn’t possible to show you the complete quilt at this time. But, I do have the quilt top all done to show you.

When Alexandra originally announced she was looking for people to join in, I already had the quilt designed and cut out! I even sent her this photo showing the progress. And can you see? Yes, the quilt that I designed and the quilt that I made are slightly different. And it is interesting to see what a few fabric substitutions can do when creating a quilt!

Even so, I was able to complete the quilt top last night, and take photos of it on the back fence this morning. No moss here in San Diego, but plenty of dew to show off the fabrics.

Even if you don’t have Instagram you can click here to check out the whole Dew and Moss Sewing Party on Instagram.