Dew and Moss Sewing Party

Today I’m joining in on the Dew and Moss sewing party over on Instagram. I know not everyone is on Instagram, so I thought I’d share some of the fun here.

Dew and Moss is the debut line of the very talented Alexandra Bordallo for Art Galery Fabrics. It features adorable illustrations of houses, flowers, bugs, lanterns, garden people and more all in fabulous earthy colors. I chose to make a quilt (as us quilters are wont to do), and I absolutely love how it turned out!

Now, normally, when I feature a quilt here I have it completely quilted and bound. And that was absolutely my intention with this quilt. But, time got away from me. And I’m planning on hand quilting this quilt. So it just wasn’t possible to show you the complete quilt at this time. But, I do have the quilt top all done to show you.

When Alexandra originally announced she was looking for people to join in, I already had the quilt designed and cut out! I even sent her this photo showing the progress. And can you see? Yes, the quilt that I designed and the quilt that I made are slightly different. And it is interesting to see what a few fabric substitutions can do when creating a quilt!

Even so, I was able to complete the quilt top last night, and take photos of it on the back fence this morning. No moss here in San Diego, but plenty of dew to show off the fabrics.

Even if you don’t have Instagram you can click here to check out the whole Dew and Moss Sewing Party on Instagram.

Everlasting Blog Tour

I’m so excited to join in today on the Everlasting Blog Tour! When Sharon Holland asked if I’d like to join in to make a project with her gorgeous new fabric line for Art Gallery Fabrics, of course I said YES! And here is the quilt that I made to showcase these fantastic prints:

The quilt was largely an improv project. I knew I wanted to use the fabrics to do some English Paper Piecing. I got my hands on the new Brimfield Awakening Brimfield Beginnings blocks. I chose the Soleil Brimfield Beginnings design. I actually made four of these blocks, but in the end decided that I would just use three for the quilt.

Once I had the Soleil blocks pieced, I needed to figure out a background. I knew I wanted something simple and modern. So I went with two 10″ strips from the Everlasting line, and then large pieces of Art Gallery Fabrics solids. A few quick seams was all I needed to stitch the background together. I then glue basted the Soleil blocks in place.

I used more Art Gallery Fabrics solids for the backing, then made the quilt sandwich. I made sure to line up the seam on the backing fabric with the middle seam on the quilt top. I love these small details of having everything line up!

The quilting is deceptively simple. I say that it is deceptive because you would think that straight lines done with a walking foot would be simple. But I found a way to complicate it.

For the two prints on the bottom, I stitched rows an inch apart using Wonderfil’s 12wt thread. It gives great texture, but keeping the lines an inch apart means that the fabric really gets to shine. For the solids, I chose to quilt lines 1/2″ apart, but with regular piecing-weight thread instead of 12wt.

I didn’t want to quilt over the Soleil blocks. And I wanted this quilt to be quilt show quality. So, I stopped each line of stitching as I came to a Soleil block, and then picked it up again on the other side. At each start and stop I tied off the thread and buried the ends. That meant over 100 tie-offs on this quilt! A lot of extra work, but I absolutely love the effect.

To add a little extra fun and whimsy to the front, I quilted pebbles inside the centers of the Soleil blocks. I think this was a fun design choice, and it had the added benefit of not needing all the tie-offs that would have been required if I stitched the lines through the center!

The final decision in the process was how to bind the quilt. Did I want to use more prints from the collection? Did I want to match the binding to the fabric on the front of the quilt? In the end I went for Art Gallery Pure Solids that were close in color to the fabrics used on the front. I chose two different solids that I color-blocked to go with the piecing on the front. The teal is along the bottom row, and then the grey goes around the rest of the quilt. This is the first time I’ve matched up the seams in my binding with the seams in the quilt, and I loved the result! I’ll absolutely do this again in the future!

I then hand-stitched down the binding on the back. This quilt won’t be entered into the San Diego Quilt Show (the deadline for entering was last week), but I wanted it to be show-quality, with all the details I’d keep in mind if it was going to be entered. Maybe I’ll enter it in an upcoming show!

The result is a quilt that could be double-sided. The back has almost as much interest as the front. And I love that the binding really pops against the backing fabrics.

All that is missing is a name for the quilt. I think I might stick with the simple title of “Everlasting Quilt.”

The Everlasting Blog Tour is just getting started! Check out more inspirational projects made with this line in the coming weeks. You can follow along the whole tour using the links below:

July 12Sharon Hollandhttps://www.sharonhollanddesigns.com
July 15Marija Vujcichttp://maraquiltdesigns.com/
July 16Carolina Moorehttp://www.AlwaysExpectMoore.com
July 17Dana Willardhttps://www.madeeveryday.com
July 18Lisa Rublehttp://lovetocolormyworld.blogspot.com/
July 19Dritz Sewinghttp://makesomething.dritz.com
July 22Eleri Kerianhttps://sewandtellproject.com/everlasting-fabrics-blog-tour/
July 23Marisa Wilhelmihttp://sewtellme.blogspot.com
July 24Sharon McConnellhttps://colorgirlquilts.com
July 25Morgan M.https://www.modernlymorgan.com
July 26Alexis Wrighthttps://mysweetsunshinestudio.com
July 29Priscilla Geisslerhttps://cottonstitch.ca
July 30Maureen Cracknellhttps://maureencracknellhandmade.blogspot.com

Double Zipper Pouch

If you’re looking for a fun twist on the basic zipper pouch, this is it! This double zipper pouch really doesn’t take much more time to make than a regular zippered pouch, and it gives you the perfect place to stash extra stuff! The smaller pocket makes a great coin pouch, or place to stash some cash or lipstick. And the larger pouch is big enough to hold a cell phone or notebook. You’ll find so many reasons to make (and gift) this great zippered pouch!

This project is part of the Little Gifts series that Underground Crafter put together. Every other week, she or one of the other participants is sharing a fun project you can stitch up with a few fat quarters of fabric. Each of these projects is small enough to fit in a stocking. So, if you follow along, you’ll have over two dozen stocking stuffers ready by Christmas time!

To make this double zipper pouch, you’ll need:

2-3 Fat quarters of fabric
2 zippers (8″ or longer)
1/4 yard of medium or lightweight interfacing
ribbon (optional)

Cut the fat quarters as follows:
Outer fabric: 2 – 8″ x 6.5″
Lining fabric: 2 – 8″ x 6.5″
Outer pocket: 2 – 8″ x 4.5″
Interfacing: 2 – 8″ x 6.5″, 1 – 8″ x 4.5″

Fuse the interfacing to the back of the two outer fabric pieces, and the back of one of the outer pocket pieces.

Grab your two outer pocket pieces, and the outer pocket zipper. Place the two fabric pieces right sides together. Put the zipper between the two, with the zipper flush with the long edge, and the zipper top facing the fabric that has the interfacing fused to it.

Pin in place.

With the zipper foot on your sewing machine, stitch right up against the raised part of the zipper. Your stitches should be at least 1/16″ away from the raised part of the zipper.

Press both fabrics away from the zipper, so the right side of the fabric is now facing out. Top stitch along the top of the fabric to secure in place, and give your zipper a nice finished look.

These are the basic steps for adding a zipper. We’re going to do these steps two more times, but first we’re going to stitch the zippered pocket we just made to the front of the zippered pouch.

Lay a piece of the outer fabric on your cutting mat, right-side-up. Place the pocket on top. Then move it so that the ends of the zipper line up with one of the lines on the cutting mat (see where I’m indicating with my finger).

Then flip up the pocket so that the bottom of the zipper now lines up with these lines. Pin, and stitch in place.

You’ve now added the front pocket. Pin it down on the edges to keep it secure for now.

Place the second zipper on top, right side down, and then a piece of lining fabric on top, right side down.

Pin. Then stitch using the zipper foot. Just as before, press the fabric away from the zipper, and then top stitch.

Repeat for the other side of the zipper. This time you’ll have the lining fabric right side up, then the zipper (which has one side of the pouch stitched to it already), and then the other outer piece of fabric.

Pin. Stitch using the zipper foot. Press fabric away from zipper. Top stitch.

Your double zipper pouch is nearly complete! Before you move on to stitching it all together, open the second zipper halfway. This is super important and what makes it possible to turn the pouch right side out later. Make sure not to skip this step!

With the zipper in the middle, move the fabrics so that the the two outer fabrics are right-sides-together, and the two lining fabrics are right-sides-together. Pin all the way around.

Starting on the bottom edge of the lining, stitch all the way around. End a couple inches before where you started, leaving a 2-3″ hole along the bottom for turning.

Clip off the extra zipper ends and clip the corners.

Turn right side out through the hole.

Find the hole in the lining.

Stitch closed.

Tuck the lining inside the zippered pouch. Your double-zippered pouch is complete!

If you like, add some ribbon to the zippered pulls.

Check out all the other fun projects in this Little Gifts series!



Quilted Pocket Organizer

When Mr. Domestic asked if I’d be part of his blog hop showing off his new line of Aura fabrics with Art Gallery Fabrics, of course I said yes and started thinking of how I wanted to use these pretty fabrics. What I immediately decided was something simple and practical. Because while I love quilts, I have so many that sit in a chest waiting for their day in the sun. And I knew I didn’t want to do that with these beautiful fabrics. So, I created a Quilted Pocket Organizer. This is a simple wall-hanging that it perfect for showing off favorite fabrics, and is super practical as a way to sort mail, keep track of important papers, or tuck items that you will need on your way out the door (like earbuds or a phone charger).

Doesn’t it show off the fabrics beautifully!? I love those gorgeous tropical florals!

Here are the basics for making this organizational wall hanging:

And here are the tips you’ll need to know in putting it together:

Once you cut all your pieces, place a purple and a cream right-sides-together, and stitch along ONE side. If your fabrics are directional, this will be the top edge. Then add interfacing on the back of the purple fabric. This will give your pocket extra body. If you want, you can add quilting or stitching at this stage for a little decoration.

Then layer the pocket together with a cream square when you add the bottom horizontal sashing piece to each. Move the pocket out of the way as you add the top horizontal sashing piece. Once all the pockets and horizontal sashings are stitched in place, add the side borders.

Then you can quilt as desired! I did a little stitch-in-the-ditch as well as supportive quilting on the outside of each pocket to give it extra stability. You can add whatever quilting you desire – just don’t quilt those pockets closed!

Before binding, I cut two 5″ squares that I folded on the diagonal, and put them in the top corners as hanging pockets. All I had to do was add a dowel, and the pocket organizer was ready to hang!

I love how it turned out, and these pockets are so handy by my front door!

Be sure to check out all the other awesome quilters and sewists who have joined in on Mister Domestic’s Aura Blog Party!


Announcing the Quilty 5k!

I am super excited to announce a new quilting series that I’m starting here, and on my YouTube Channel!

It is called the Quilty 5k! There are 7 blocks in a mile, and 3.1 miles in a 5k. So for the quilty 5k, we’ll be completing 22 blocks. Each will have instructions for stitching it in 3 different sizes, as well as different coloring options and a coloring sheet so you can design your own quilts using the quilt blocks!

Check out all the details in the intro video!

I hope you’ll join in!


Free Motion Quilting II

One of my most popular videos on YouTube is a simple video where I teach 8 simple free-motion quilting designs. Recently, I hit 10,000 subscribers on my YouTube channel, and decided to celebrate by following up on that popular video.

This video is a sequel of sorts to the first video. I show you 8+ more free motion quilting designs that you can make that expand on that same swirl motion that I taught in the first video.

I hope you enjoy learning a little more about free motion quilting!

Pizza Pillow

If you’re looking for some fun and whimsical decor, whip up this fun pizza pillow! It is super fun to make, and super comfortable to lay on!

These steps will give you the basics of how this pizza pillow comes together, but you’ll need some basic sewing skills (or a friend with some basic sewing skills).

You’ll also need a giant circle pillow, fabric for your crust, cheese, and pepperonis, matching thread, some plain white fabric, and fusible web.

Use a water soluble pen to draw a slice on your pillow.

Cut into the pillow. Once you’ve cut the lines on the top, you can remove the stuffing and cut the bottom layer to match.

Use the wedge and remainder of the circle as templates to cut the crust pieces.

Measure the edges of the wedge to determine how large your strips need to be. Cut two from the white and two from the crust. These create the depth on your wedge and circle pieces.

Re-create the casing piece for your wedge. Make it 1/2″ larger than the original wedge. This makes up for the seam allowance that will get used up on both the wedge and the main pie.

You can use a can lid to curve the edges to prevent sharp corners.

Put fusible web on the back of the pepperoni colored fabric. Draw circles, and cut out.

Cut the cheese the same size as the top crust, then measure in and trim off the extra.

Fuse the cheese to the crust.

Fuse on the pepperoni, Make sure to fuse them onto the slice as well.

Overlap the slice (which is a 1/2″ larger to make up for the lost seam allowance, and place the pepperonis accordingly.

Applique stitch on the cheese and pepperoni.

Now add the strips to create the depth for the wedge and main pie.

Finish up the casing as well. Fill the casing. The outer layer you can either stitch up by hand or add a zipper to make it easy to remove and wash.

Prosecco Wine Bag

If you’re looking for a fun way to gift a bag of wine (especially a fun wine like Prosecco) then I have the perfect idea for you with this simple to make Prosecco wine bag!

Measure the height of your bottle and add 3″. This is the height of your fabric. Measure around your bottle and add 2″, this is the width of your fabric. Cut an outer piece and a lining piece.

To the side, pin several ribbons.

Fold the fabric in half, right sides together. Stitch the bottom and side, which will stitch the ribbon in place. Do the same with the lining piece, leaving a 4″gap for turning.

Turn the outer piece right-side-out, then place inside the lining, making sure to tuck the ribbons inside. Pin around the top edge.

Stitch the top edge closed.

Turn right side out through the hole in the lining.

Topstitch along the top edge. And stitch the hole in the lining closed.

Tuck in your bottle of wine, and tie with the ribbons.

Cricut Embroidery Hoop

When I first started playing with my Cricut Maker, I was super excited that I could use it to cut fabric. But then I learned that when they added the rotary blade, they also added another tool to the Cricut arsenal – the water-soluble pen! This pen can be used with any of the Cricut machines with a pen adapter (so the Explore and Explore Air certainly qualify), and is perfect for drawing lines to make your own embroidery designs!

I used this Jen Goode Butterfly design that I thought would be perfect, but you can use whatever line-art style art you like.

Use the water soluble marker to have the Cricut machine draw on your fabric.

Then you can stitch on your design.

When you’re done, just rinse of the ink under the sink and let the fabric dry.

Super simple, and super cute!

Dream Sewing Room

When my friend Cheryl asked if I wanted to be part of her sewing room blog tour, of course I said yes. In part because I really don’t know how to say no to anything… and in part because I really needed a deadline. My sewing and crafting room has been in serious need of a facelift for months, and having a deadline would give me the motivation I needed to get it all put together. Read on to for the story of my new space, and be sure to check out the links at the very end of other fabulous sewing spaces!

Dream Sewing Room! Isn't this the dreamiest little sewing corner? Found over at www.AlwaysExpectMoore.com

For months I have been dreaming of my new sewing and crafting room. About four months ago, we had a flood in our kitchen. The drainpipe in the wall behind the sink in our 1957 Bungalow was made of cast iron, and had cracked. Water leaked into the walls, and soaked the floors. All the cabinets and flooring were going to need to be ripped up. Which was made more complicated because there was asbestos found under the living room carpet, and in the walls. And the glazing of the tiles was found to have lead in it.

The process ended up being fairly involved. My sewing room looked very much like it did the last time I did a sewing room tour in 2016. I had to pack up the closet, which meant my sewing room looked like this:

things pulled from closet

Then, I had to move everything away from the other interior wall so that the bathroom that shares that wall could be re-piped. So my sewing room looked like this:

things shoved in the corner

Before putting everything back, I re-painted the walls. They were a yellow-beige, and are now a soft blue-grey. And, I decided not to put everything back where it had been. My needs have changed since I first set up the room 3 years ago. I do a lot more typing at my desk, so need some real desk space. And I need dedicated work space for crafting. And I needed video set-up, preferably set-up that would work for crafting, and set-up that would work for sewing. I had two months to plan and dream up how my crafting space would look when I could finally move back in.

First, a dedicated sewing space. The machine could stay set up at all times. The ironing board is right behind the machine for easy access. And all my threads are close at hand on the wall. Plus, the backdrop of thread and mini quilts is great for filming video.

sewing corner

Second, a dedicated crafting space. Right up against the window for great natural light in the afternoons. A bright, white desktop for taking photos. This faces the sewing space, so I also have great eye candy.

crafting workspace

Third, a desktop space for typing at the laptop. With a great background for Facebook Live videos and for YouTube videos.

video background

This is flanked by large shelving on either side that hold papercrafting supplies, my Cricut Machine, and printers.

video backdrop

While I do feel a pang of envy when I see my friends have beautiful, all-white spaces with everything tucked behind cabinet doors, I find that this setup works best for me. I’m very visual, so open shelving means I get to see my supplies and be inspired by them. The spaces are all designed to be flexible, I can easily change out the video backdrop by removing the black bulletin board from the shelf it sits on. And above the bulletin board are curtain rods with clips I can use to hang quilts, streamers, or anything else I want to use as a video background.

And while I love having a clean space to start crafting on, it doesn’t always stay this crisp. As I cycle through projects and deadlines, you’ll find different projects on each surface…

This was when I was working on the pizza pillow for Fairfield…

This was when I was working on clay pot craft projects.

This was when I was finishing up my hot glue gun book (which will be out this fall).

And this is what it looks like now!

cleared space

I’m currently working on re-organizing the closet. Having a functional closet in this room will make such a difference in being able to manage the clutter in this space!

Thanks so much for joining me on this tour of my craft room! Be sure to check out these other Dream Sewing Spaces!

April 23 – Lori Crawley Kennedy – http://theinboxjaunt.com/
April 24 – Jennifer Thomas – http://curlicuecreations.blogspot.com
April 25 – Robin Koehler – http://nestlingsbyrobin.blogspot.com
April 26 – Andi Barney- https://www.andibarney.com/
April 27 – Misty Cole – http://www.mistycole.com/blog
April 28 – Carolina Moore- https://alwaysexpectmoore.com/
April 29 – Heather Pregger – https://heatherquilts.blogspot.com/
April 30 – Linda Bratten – https://lindabcreative.blogspot.com/
May 1 – Lisa Reber – https://www.dippydye.blogspot.com/
May 2 – Teresa Coates – http://www.crinkledreams.com
May 3 – Lisa Chin – http://www.lisachinartist.com/
May 4 – Jamie Fingal – http://www.jamiefingaldesigns.com/
May 5 – Sam Hunter – www.huntersdesignstudio.com
May 6 – Jessee Maloney – www.artschooldropout.net/blog
May 7 – Rhanda Parrish – http://www.sewartsyfartsy.com/
May 8 – Sarah Vedeler- https://meaningoflifedesigns.com/
May 9 – Jessica Darling – https://jessicakdarling.com/
May 10 – Melody Crust – http://www.melodycrust.com/
May 11 – Debby Brown – http://higheredhands.blogspot.com
May 12 – Cheryl Sleboda – http://blog.muppin.com